Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Translation and Subtitling: A Study on Telephone Conversation Opening and Closing, with English and Persian in Focus

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Translation and Subtitling: A Study on Telephone Conversation Opening and Closing, with English and Persian in Focus

Article excerpt

Abstract

The present study aims to focus on telephone conversation opening and closing in Persian and the problems which may emerge in translating them into English. With particular attention to the studies done on telephone conversations by Schegloff(1968; 1986), Liddicoat (2007), Taleghani Nikazem (2002), and Khadem and Eslami Rasekh (2012), the researchers intend to analyze some movies and series in Persian as the source language and compare them with their subtitled translations in English. The corpus of the study consists of the telephone conversations in Persian with their subtitled translations, which both are extracted from these movies and series. As there are some differences in the cultures of both Persian and English and some peculiarities exist in the structure of telephone conversations in both languages, there seems some noticeable findings will be achieved.

Keywords: the summons-answer sequence, pre-closing sequences, identification-recognition sequences, terminal sequences

1. Introduction

English is the language of the globalized world and it is used as a lingua Franca in international communities (Graddol, 1997). Because of so, nowadays people in every country pay a special attention to learning English as a second language. For example, these days in Iran people approximately ranging from kids around 6 to adults around 40 or 50 are learning English in language institutes. Besides learning English in institutes, they get help from subtitled movies in order to improve their skills. Most of the time they are mostly interested to see how some cultural points or special interactions are performed in English, so they choose the movies either in English or Persian and their subtitles are either Persian or English respectively .Of course there are some other alternatives too, but because of the purpose of the present study, the researchers have only mentioned the two options above.

The researchers in this study aim to focus on telephone conversations and see how the different parts of telephone conversations have been translated, so they have selected some movies and series in Persian with English as the subtitled form of them.

1.1 Why telephone Conversations?

As the cultures of English and Persian are different in some points, and some peculiarities exist in the two languages regarding telephone conversations, the researchers think translators will face lots of problems in dealing with them.

1.2 Literature Review

Different researchers have focused on telephone conversation opening and closing in different languages .For example by analyzing the telephone conversation openings in English, Schegloff(1986) claims that a telephone conversation opening in English includes four parts :1) a summon-answer sequence, 2) an identification-recognition sequence,3) a greeting sequence ,and at last 4) how are you sequences.

Liddicoat (2007) has analyzed the structure of telephone conversation openings and closings and the same as schegloffhe mentions those four sequences in telephone conversation openings and focuses in detail on different parts. Regarding the closing, he argues that the closing of a telephone conversation is done collaboratively by both participants in action. First they both prepare a closing implicative environment, and then the preclosings are mentioned such as ok and alright, and at last the terminal components.

Taleghani-Nikazm (2002) has explored the structure of telephone conversation opening in Iran and suggests that like the sequential organization of telephone conversation opening in English, Iranians have these four sequences too. That is, a summon-answer sequences, then identification-recognition sequences after that a greeting sequence and at last the how are you sequences. In addition to that, she has contrasted "ritual routines" in telephone conversation openings in Iran and Germany. She specifically has focused on the ritual "how are you" in both cultures. …

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