Academic journal article Higher Education Studies

Practice Led Research: Creative Activity, Academic Debate, and Intellectual Rigour

Academic journal article Higher Education Studies

Practice Led Research: Creative Activity, Academic Debate, and Intellectual Rigour

Article excerpt

Abstract

By focussing on PhD supervision as well as creativity, this paper explores how the artefact and exegesis PhD offers an opportunity to bring creative activity together with academic debate and intellectual rigour. In this context, the latter does not justify the former nor interpret it in an academic and theoretical way. Rather, acting together, the artefact and exegesis bridge the Cartesian binary, offer new models of knowledge to the academy, and enrich the artistic practices of the practitioners themselves. The creative practitioner thus brings to the academy new dimensions of what knowledge itself consists of and how this contributes to learning. Because this disputes the regular academic templates, it challenges the academy itself. The methodology I employ in this paper is one of narrativity that I call the 'subjective academic narrative', it practices the theory of academic knowledge as personal and draws together the Cartesian binary of the personal and the intellectual.

Keywords: Creativity, Narrativity, PHD supervsion

1. Introduction

Today, whilst paradoxically deleting many arts-based courses from their curricula, many Australian universities are becoming more open to creative practice-led research as knowledge.

The philosopher Peter Singer (2009:15) states that:

'...an educated citizen in a free society should have a grounding in philosophy, literature, the sciences, maths, foreign languages, politics and fine arts...This kind of education does not train you in a profession, but it gives you an intellectual foundation to use throughout your life...'

This kind of education is also basic to creativity throughout our social fabric; and creativity is also an important contributor to the economic as well as social well-being of our culture. Creative Industries contribute significantly to Australia's economic as well as social and cultural well-being.

The Department of State and Regional development report 'NSW Creative Industry: Economic Fundamentals' 2008 defines creative industries rather traditionally as:

'advertising; architecture; design; visual arts; music; performing arts; publishing; film; television; radio electronic games' by their own scope rather than including 'downstream stages...such as manufacturing, wholesale, distribution, retailing and second hand sales.'(2008:7)

So the role of creative industries in the economic welfare of Australia is a large and growing one. The report states that:

'The creative industry is a significant component of NSW's economy, employing over 5 per cent of the workforce (of 150,000) Further, over the 10 years to 2006, employment in the creative industry increased by 28 per cent, against 13.5 per cent for all industries.' (2008:8)

It adds a cautionary note: 'creative industry employment growth across Australia was marginally higher than for NSW" (2008:10)

Creative industries employ large sections of the Australian community quite directly. The above report quotes the OECD estimates of cultural/creative contributions in Australia as 3.1% of the GDP, comparable with Canada at 3.5%; France at 2.8%; and the U.S .A. at 3.3% but outflanked by the UK at 5.8%. (pp8) Such industries also engage informally many creative artists as part of developing their own subjective selves to transform society. Strangely, until quite recently, they have been largely ignored by Universities dominated by traditional models of knowledge and now turned into business models themselves.

There are strong economic as well as cultural reasons, then, that today, whilst paradoxically deleting many arts-based courses from their curricula, many Australian universities are becoming open to creative practice-led research as knowledge. (Oakley: 2004)

The opportunities presented by the creativity and research nexus are potentially transformative as they provide us with the ability to look at the world in new ways, to look through different prisms and lenses and through other people's eyes so as to develop new aesthetics. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.