Academic journal article Reading Horizons

Dear Reading Horizon Readers

Academic journal article Reading Horizons

Dear Reading Horizon Readers

Article excerpt

This issue represents the last issue, number four, of Volume 51. Beginning in the fall, Reading Horizons will enter a new publication year with a new look. Reading Horizons is looking to grow and reach out to our literacy community. We are using Scholar-Works to become available as a digital publication where we will soon be accepting online submissions. In addition, we plan to expand our web-presence with a blog, Facebook page, Twitter, Pinterest, and possibly more.

Please note that this web presence will unfold slowly over the next year to determine where you, the readers, would like to see us. Think of this upcoming process much like the signs dotting our highways this summer "Under Construction". We know that the end results should mirror a smooth and far more enjoyable ride- so much for the highway metaphor.

This issue starts out with an invitation to the cafe culture issued by authors Mathers and Stern. In the cafe setting, adolescents can enjoy the pleasure of choice in reading material. Based on a survey of 160 adolescents, Mathers and Stern found that although adolescents admit to the importance of reading, they rarely engage voluntarily in reading books for pleasure. Citing the origins of the first coffeehouses around 1400 in Constantinople and later institutionalized in Europe among the literarie, the authors outline criteria for and examples of four existing successful school cafes where reading for pleasure has increased.

Next, authors Mundy, Ross, and Leko take us inside two elementary schools in north central Florida to share their qualitative data on two differing literacy coaches. Following the two coaches, the authors chronicled and described how these two coaches interpreted and delivered professional development very differently with their respective faculties. One employed a knowledge-for-practice in her role as expert, while the other conceptualized her role as knowledge-in-practice in her role as collaborator. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.