Academic journal article Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology

Sustenance of Tourism Industry for the Socio-Economic Development of Ekiti State, Nigeria

Academic journal article Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology

Sustenance of Tourism Industry for the Socio-Economic Development of Ekiti State, Nigeria

Article excerpt

Abstract

This study examined the sustenance of tourism sector for the socio-economic development of Ekiti State, Nigeria. Tourism is playing an increasingly important role in the economy of many nations in the world today, especially in the area of job creation. Data for this study were collected from primary sources through the administration of two (2) sets of a well structured interview questionnaire. One hundred and fifty (150) were administered on workers/management of the randomly selected (50 each) in the study area. Another 150 questionnaires (50 each) were also randomly administered on visitors/patronizers of the hotels in the study area. Results from this study showed that management practices as well as management information system (MIS) in most of the hotels from the study area varies and not encouraging. This study therefore recommends that modern management practices and information system should be a priority in the study area. This study will be useful to government, planners, researchers, investors, policy makers and individuals in ensuring the sustenance of tourism for the socio-economic development of Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Keywords: development, Ekiti State, Nigeria, socio-economic, sustenance, tourism industry

1. Introduction

Tourism is known to create jobs at various levels that are essential to the growth of the rural and national economy of a country (Ekechukwu, 2010).

The world Tourism organization (WTO) at an International Government Conference held in Ottawa, Canada in 1991, defined Tourism as comprising the activities of persons travelling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business or other purposes (Holloway, 2006). That tourism is a thriving industry worldwide is a well established fact. As an industry, it is either the backbone or one of the top three fastest growing industries in countries like Kenya, U.S.A., Indonesia, Canada, France, United Kingdom, the Bahamas and Barbados etc. As far as Nigeria is concerned, tourism attraction centres is still very young, and there is paucity of data on its growth pattern (Afolabi, 2008).

Nigeria's effort directed at developing the tourism industry can be dated back to 1900, when Lokoja was the seat of Lord Lugard, the Governor General of Nigeria, in Colonial history, Lokoja was therefore the capital of Nigeria between 1900 and 1901. Realizing these potentials, scholars commenced development research works to generate ideas and data on which policies on tourism development could be based (Obateru, 2004).

In January 2001, the National Tourism Development Commission (NTDS) Abuja commenced the registration of tourism enterprises in order to harmonize all efforts directed at developing the tourist facilities in Nigeria. Ekiti State benefited a great deal from the exercise, in that it made possible, inventory and capacity building in the tourism industry (Obateru, 2004).

Tourism is now one of the world's largest industries and one of its fastest growing economic sectors (Grace & Querini, 2011). They further noted that for many countries, tourism is seen as a main instrument for regional development, as it stimulates new economic activities.

Tourism is playing an increasingly important role in the economy of many nations in the world today, contributing to their economic growth and job creation, and providing employment and income (Allan, 2002). Because tourism industry is seen as growth sectors and continue to be considered as labour intensive with low entry possibilities, policy makers tend to view the development of tourism as a way to tackle unemployment and underemployment. This is especially the case for persons at the bottom of the labour market, such as unemployed youth, the long-term unemployed, the less-skilled, ethnic minority groups and, to some degree, women (re-entering the labour market) (Michael, 2010).

Tourism is about people. …

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