Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

CREATING and LAUNCHING Innovative Nursing Education Programs: Perils and Pearls

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

CREATING and LAUNCHING Innovative Nursing Education Programs: Perils and Pearls

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT Nursing's future depends on continuing to seek, create, and launch innovative nursing programs. Successful innovation can improve nursing education delivery and make optimal use of available resources while tapping into the imagination and creativity of faculty and students; in addition, it can create an optimistic environment and encourage beneficial change with the faculty and staff. Innovation has been described as an art, a process of diffusion, and a process of transforming ideas into real value. The purpose of this article is to explore the concepts surrounding innovation, steps in development of an innovation, and share pearls, perils, and lessons learned so that others can explore the process within their nursing education programs.

Key Words Innovation - Nursing Education - Transformation

HEALT H C A RE C OM PLEXIT I E S AN D TH E UB I Q U I TO U S N U R S IN G SHO RTAGE R E QUIRE A CO NT IN UA L REVIEW OF TH E V I TALIT Y AN D I NV E NTORY O F O UR N U RSI N G PROGRAM S. Our future depends on our seeking, creating, and launching i nnovative nursing educ ation programs. Successful innovation can improve nursing education delivery and make optimal use of available resources while tapping into the imagination and creativity of faculty and students. When innovation leads to an optimistic environment, faculty, staff, and students benefit.

Innovation has been described as an art, a process of diffusion and a process of transforming ideas into real value (Kelly, 2001; Rogers, 1995). Although innovation in nursing education is seen as key to solving the nursing shortage (Institute of Medicine, 2011), it is often difficult to accomplish as the academic process is bound by tradition and restricted by time constraints and large student loads. Education redesign that incorporates the findings of the 2009 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Report presents a perfect opportunity to create curriculum realignments that will accommodate the current needs of nursing practice (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2009).

To those who relish creative ideas for old problems or unique approaches to new problems, the process of innovation is stimulating and exhilarating. It is not random but, rather, it is carefully planned, beginning with strategic brainstorming by two or three people. The innovation is then pushed forward by a small group of creative thinkers and early adopters (Rogers, 1995). The process of innovation may change when more is at stake, such as a major shiftinvolving a new curriculum and education delivery method or a totally new approach to the university process. When such change is successful, everyone gets on board, and the program is disseminated through published articles, conferences, or by word of mouth and then replicated, duplicated, and borrowed.

Even with excellent ideas, the process may be flawed, and if the program does not work under current circumstances, it may be best t o set the idea aside and bring it back at a later time. Once the team works out the in itial problems and solves the primary challenges, the proposal ca n be r ecycled, often by bringing others in to fur ther expl ore, refine, and adapt the pr oc ess into a stro ng program for c hange.

The purpose of this article is to explore the concepts surrounding innovation, steps in development of an innovation, and share pearls, perils, and lessons learned so that others can explore the process within their nursing education programs. Examples are based on the authors' experiences working with multidisciplinary teams of educators and health care providers in creating the Nurse Knowledge Exch ange for Kaiser Permanent e (www.ideo.com/work/ nurse-knowledge-exchange/) and several innovative, web-based nursing education projects (Allen, Collins, Schumann, & Selz, 2007; Allen, Van Dyke, & Armstrong, 2010; Scott-Tilley et al., 2007).

In no vatio n F r a m e w ork Formalizing the process of innovation within an institution provides structure to the creative process. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.