Constitutional Limits on the Right of Government Investigators to Interview and Examine Alleged Victims of Child Abuse or Neglect

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

Investigating allegations of child abuse or neglect presents unique challenges, particularly if parents or guardians are the alleged perpetrators. Those accused of harming the children are in a position to prevent the victims from getting access to the help they need to escape their abuser(s). The courts have not clearly defined the federal constitutional boundaries of searches and seizures in this context. The Supreme Court, in particular, has not weighed in on the constitutionality of warrantless searches and seizures in connection with abuse and neglect investigations. This lack of Supreme Court guidance has led to unpredictable and sometimes conflicting opinions from state and lower federal courts, particularly with respect to Fourth Amendment requirements in this context. This Article will examine whether court orders allowing searches and seizures in child abuse or neglect cases can be issued based on a standard lower than probable cause and still pass muster under the Fourth Amendment. Additionally, it discusses the special needs exception to the Fourth Amendment's warrant requirement and weighs arguments in favor of and in opposition to applying the special needs exception to child abuse and neglect investigations. Finally, the Article discusses whether searches without a warrant or other court order may be conducted in response to allegations of child abuse or neglect if the special needs exception does not apply.

INTRODUCTION

Government workers are tasked with investigating allegations of abuse or neglect of children. It is clear that the Fourth Amendment applies to most investigative options involving direct contact with the alleged victim.1 Interviews are searches,2 and taking children into custody - even temporarily for the purpose of interviewing them - involves a seizure.3 What is unclear is under what circumstances these searches or seizures violate the Fourth Amendment. There are cases that discuss rather extensively the right to remove children from their parents' custody without a warrant (requiring exigent or emergency circumstances and, in some cases, evidence that there was no time to get a court order).4 However, this Article focuses on the right to search or seize evidence. In other words, to what extent can social workers investigate child abuse allegations without consent or a warrant supported by probable cause?

Investigating allegations of child abuse or neglect presents unique challenges, particularly if parents or guardians are the alleged perpetrators. Those accused of harming the children are in the perfect position to prevent the alleged victims from getting access to the help they need to escape their abuser(s). In cases in which the reports of abuse or neglect are insufficient to meet the standard of probable cause necessary to issue a warrant, there may not be a meaningful investigation.5 Without the ability to interview or examine the children (both of which constitute searches under the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution),6 the government may be unable to assess whether the allegations of abuse or neglect can be substantiated, much less meet the burden of proof necessary to remove children from an abusive or neglectful environment. This can be particularly troubling in cases in which there is little or no opportunity to gather evidence because the children have limited contact with persons other than the alleged abusers. For example, children who live in a geographically isolated or culturally insular community may have limited contact with people who are willing and able to observe and report signs of abuse. If abuse is suspected, the information gathered may be insufficient to establish the probable cause necessary to obtain a search warrant. Even if the child regularly interacts with teachers, administrators, child care providers, or others who may be inclined or required to report suspected abuse, there may not be sufficient evidence to justify issuance of a warrant to search or seize the child. …

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