Academic journal article Hispanic Review

Hidden Messages. Representation and Resistance in Andean Colonial Drama

Academic journal article Hispanic Review

Hidden Messages. Representation and Resistance in Andean Colonial Drama

Article excerpt

Raquel Chang-Rodriguez. Hidden messages. Representation and Resistance in Andean Colonial Drama. Lewisburg: Bucknell UP, 1999. 145 pages.

Hidden Messages brings together five studies by Raquel Chang-- Rodriguez, earlier versions of which originally appeared in different publications, mainly in Spanish. In this collection Prof. Chang-Rodriguez continues her exploration of colonial literature in search of revealing moments in which alternative political and historical views emerge. In this regard, the book follows the same critical perspective that informed her previous works, La subversion del signo, and El discurso disidente. While the former focused on the possibilities found by Andean colonial chroniclers in the writing of history to express a historical version divergent from their Spanish counterparts, in Hidden messages the author has turned her attention to Andean drama and its relation to the Andean past and the colonial present. These essays, informed by recent scholarship in Andean studies, succeeds in providing key historical contexts by which to access four different Andean plays.

The first chapter offers a very brief account on the emergence of missionary theater, placing it in the wider context of the conversion and instruction of the American Indians. Because the purpose of this chapter is to serve as an introduction to the analysis of individual plays that follows, it suffers from the inevitable disadvantage of being too general and rather unanchored in time and place.

The second chapter focuses on the Andean interpretation of the Spanish conquest in Peru found in the Chayanta version of the Quechua drama known as Tragedy of Atahualpa's Death. Here Prof. Chang-Rodriguez reads the drama against the background of anti-colonial movements in Peru from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, by highlighting the persistence of an Andean vision of the conquest that contemplated the possibility of a return of the Inca.

The third chapter deals with the seventeenth-century Quechua play Usca Paucar, attributed to the cuzqueno author Vasco Jacinto de Contreras y Valverde. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.