Academic journal article Reading Horizons

Dear Reading Horizon Readers

Academic journal article Reading Horizons

Dear Reading Horizon Readers

Article excerpt

A new season and a new start to a school semester/year are fully upon us. And our first volume and issue of a new print season is now in your hands, or on your screen. However, it is our task to see that the last issue of this volume is totally on-line keeping with the promise of an on-line journal.

While new beginnings can be an exciting time for the many initiatives that we as educators deal with annually, it can also be fraught with trepidation and a sense of what we are losing when we give up an old medium. In his publication, Book Was There: Reading in Electronic Times, Andrew Piper elegantly and eloquently traces the historic journey of the reading and handling of books as well as the reading and interfacing with digital print. Not choosing one over the other, Piper describes the "graspability" of books as well as the historic and inspirational experiences of what one does when handling, holding, tracing with one's finger as in bookmarking, and carrying a book. The screen does not offer that feature, but is never viewed as less than Book.

All this is to say that personally, I will miss holding a book, a journal, a hands-on nonelectronic device. In transitioning to an on-line publication, I will miss the visual and tactile pleasures afforded me in holding a book.

This issue of Reading Horizons has much to offer in-hand as well as on-screen with the following three articles. Husband's article addresses the issue of underachieving African American boys in early childhood and elementary grades using a multi-contextual approach. Husband's article brings new light to the issues relevant to younger African American males which adds to the growing literature on the pre-adolescent and adolescent African American males. While recognizing that not all African American boys fall into the category of underachieving readers, Husband details factors that impact young boys in general and African American boys in particular with the emphasis on change in curriculum, teachers and schools.

Next, Hu, Chen, and Li present their examination of Five Chinese first-graders who experienced growth in both bilingual and biliteracy development through the use of English/Chinese picture books. …

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