Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

The Collect in the Churches of the Reformation

Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

The Collect in the Churches of the Reformation

Article excerpt

The Collect in the Churches of the Reformation. Edited by Bridget Nichols. S(M Studies in Worship and Liturgy. (London: SCM Press, 2010, Pp. xiv, 232. $55.00.)

This collection of essays by noted international liturgical scholars provides a comparative view of how one specific piece of the liturgy, the historic four-part prayer form known as the collect, has evolved through time and has been adapted to contemporary liturgical usage. Most of the essays analyze the sources of a particular denomination's worship resources and assess how the collect form has been used throughout that denomination's history and in the eucharistie liturgies currently in use. Several of the essays also relate the collect to the church's hymnody and the devotional life of the laity. Issues of translation addressed include both the historical challenge of translating Latin collects into the language of the people and the contemporary questions raised by the inclusive language movement in the development of new liturgical resources. Separate essays consider the collect in relation to the development of lectionaries and to twentieth-century prayer collections composed by individual authors.

The foundational essay by editor Bridget Nichols on "The Collect in English: Vernacular Beginnings" surveys the sources and composition of the collects of the 1549 Anglican Book of Common Prayer. Donald Gray's essay, "The Anglican Collect," explicates the collect tradition in various historical editions of the Book of Common Prayer from the Church of England and selected prayer books from around the Anglican Communion (U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland). Gray also addresses questions of linguistic style and what he calls "performative matters" related to the collect.

The Lutheran tradition is analyzed well by a pair of essays. Nils-Henrik Nilsson emphasizes the continuity of the Church of Sweden's collect form usage with the catholic tradition and the church around the world. Frank Senn provides an insightful analysis into the development of the collect form through the history of American Lutheran liturgical books, revealing his own involvement in the compilation of the two most recent ones. …

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