Academic journal article Migration Letters

Migration, Technology, and Transculturation: A Global Perspective

Academic journal article Migration Letters

Migration, Technology, and Transculturation: A Global Perspective

Article excerpt

Myna German and Padmini Banerjee (eds.), Migration, Technology, and Transculturation: a Global Perspective, St Charles, MO, USA: Undenwood University Press, 2011, 288pp., (ISBNI 3: 978-0984630745), (paper).

German and Banerjee compiled a well-focused volume on promoting transculturation perspective in relation to technology and migration featuring 14 papers from academics from around the globe. It is often very difficult to put together a focused and conceptually neat edited volume and German and Banerjee have managed to do that. Contributors discuss various cases with a view which points out the rise of transculturation concept in understanding the complexity of transnational mobility and movers pursuing lives here and there. Within an interdisciplinary framework, most of the contributions relate to the United States, however, there are useful notes on the European case too. The editors were mainly concerned about the ways in which technology have impacted on migration by enabling constant and easy contact between the host and home countries.

In the opening chapter of the first part, Buzzi and Megele explore the role of digital practices in relation to identity and migration and reformulating the question of inbetween state of being. Then Lijtmaer takes on the nostalgia and mourning and how migrants use technology to reconnect with their lost past. Following paper uses Russian speaking community in examining what she calls virtual diaspora via internet, "a sphere of communication with compatriots". Cordini presents her study on identity construction among second generation immigrant children in a secondary school in Milan. Accordingly, second generation copes with the issues of identity back and forth between the host and origin countries with the help of internet which bridges the "migrant" and the natives more easily then the real life experiences. …

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