Academic journal article Journal of Healthcare Management

Editorial

Academic journal article Journal of Healthcare Management

Editorial

Article excerpt

Careful thinking will be required to negotiate the vagaries of healthcare reform. Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has weathered its strongest challenges to date, changes resulting from reform will continue into the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the extent and scope of those changes have yet to be fully determined. This issue of IHM presents an ample collection of points to ponder as we push on to 2013 and confront the unfolding developments.

Teri G. Fontenot, FACHE, president and CEO of Woman's Hospital in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is this issue's interview subject. Ms. Fontenot describes the influence of Top 100 Best Places to Work in Healthcare status and Magnet designation on building a culture of engaged and empowered employees, her experience on the Federal Reserve Bank board, and pressing issues in women's health research and care delivery.

Reform columnist Nathan S. Kaufman proposes that exceptionally high net revenue per adjusted discharge driven by high managed care rates is a common factor among high-performing "model" health systems and argues that effective managed care contracting will be the principal driver of profitability over the next 5 years. Integrated Health Systems columnist Daniel K. Zismer, PhD, describes the next level of integrated and coordinated community healthcare and its need for standardized care models and practices. He concludes with several likely challenges to be faced by health systems as they transition to that next level of integration.

Accountable care organizations and bundled payment, two important components of the ACA, are examined by Patrick D. Shay and Stephen S. Mick, PhD, FACHE, in terms of their potential to influence vertical integration of post-acute care services from the perspective of acute care hospitals. Given the diversity of anticipated and unanticipated performance consequences resulting from the vertical integration activity expected from health reform, the solid, theoretically informed predictions developed by the authors are particularly timely.

Hospitals and providers participating in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) provide valuable access to clinical trials and innovative cancer treatments for people residing far from major oncology centers. …

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