Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

A Decade of Published Evidence for Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Interventions

Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

A Decade of Published Evidence for Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Interventions

Article excerpt

Abstract

Current psychiatric nursing practice remains grounded in tradition, unsystematic trial and error, and authority. Although some of the wisdom that has been passed down over time is questionable, it continues to influence nursing practice today. This state-of-the-evidence review examined features of intervention studies published between January 2006 and December 2010 in five psychiatric nursing journals; it compared findings with those from a previous study of comparable literature published between 2000 and 2005. The analysis included studies that evaluated strategies, procedures, or practices that promote mental health or prevent mental illness. Of the 553 data-based articles, 71% tested interventions; 54% were conducted in the United States. Intervention studies reflected psychological (38%) social (17%), and biological (1%) dimensions of the biopsychosocial model. Some studies involved two dimensions and 17% included all three dimensions. Studies involved nurses, students, or staff (15%), mentally ill (50%), or mentally healthy persons (35%) ranging in age from childhood through older adulthood. The 10 year review showed continuing progress toward increased dissemination compared to earlier years; less focus on nurses, students, and staff; an increase in international studies; and greater emphasis on holistic interventions. In this article, the authors note a need for more randomized, controlled trials and studies to compare effectiveness across interventions.

Citation: Zauszniewski, A. J., Bekhet, A., Haberlein, S. (August 27, 2012) "A Decade of Published Evidence for Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Interventions" OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 17 No. 3.

DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Voll7No03HirshPsy01

Keywords: State-of-the science, psychiatric nursing, evidence-based practice, biopsychosocial model interventions, clinical trials, dissemination, mental health, mental illness, global health

The Study

The need for quality psychiatric care based on the best and most current research is well documented. However, historically, psychiatric nursing practice has been influenced by traditional wisdom passed down through generations by word of mouth and in published textbooks (Zauszniewski & Suresky, 2003). Much of this nursing care has been based on personal experience and the experiences of nurses and others who have gone before them. Current psychiatric nursing practice is still grounded in tradition, unsystematic trial and error, and authority. Some psychiatric nursing knowledge comes from Old Wives' Tales,' reflecting the perspectives of women from the past. This 'received wisdom' is often taken for granted and reflexively put into practice. Even though some of the wisdom that has been passed down over time is questionable, it continues to influence psychiatric nursing practice today.

In this article, research evidence is reviewed to provide a basis for its use in clinical practice. This ' sta te -of -the - evidence' review examined literature from January 2006 through December 2010 and compared these findings with those from a previous study of comparable literature published between 2000 and 2005 (Zauszniewski, Suresky, Bekhet, & Kidd, 2007). Boyd's (2011) biopsychosocial model provided the framework for organizing intervention studies into three categories: biological, psychological, and social (See Figure). The model takes a holistic approach and consists of three separate but interdependent domains: biologic, psychological, and social (Boyd, 2011). Although the domains differ, they interact with each other. Indeed, after considering patients' circumstances and other factors, selection of a nursing approach involves integrating biologic, psychological, and social interventions into a comprehensive plan of care. Nursing interventions are defined as activities that assess dysfunction, enhance and promote health, and assist patients to regain or improve their coping abilities and/or prevent further disabilities (ANA, 2000). …

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