Academic journal article McGill Journal of Education (Online)

Negotiating Worlds, Words and Identities: Scaffolded Literacies for Pre-Service Teachers and Children/négocier Les Mondes, Les Mots et Les Identités: Soutien À L'apprentissage Des Littératies Pour Les Futurs Enseignants et Les Enfants

Academic journal article McGill Journal of Education (Online)

Negotiating Worlds, Words and Identities: Scaffolded Literacies for Pre-Service Teachers and Children/négocier Les Mondes, Les Mots et Les Identités: Soutien À L'apprentissage Des Littératies Pour Les Futurs Enseignants et Les Enfants

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT. Aiming to extend sociocultural theory about the teaching and learning of literacies, this article reports on data from a qualitative study underpinned by a sociocultural framework (Rogoff, 1990; Vygotsky, 1986). Conducted in an Australian university community, the project tracked a group of pre-service teachers engaging in scaffolded literacy events, such as face-to-face and on-line discussions and shared reading experiences with children. Highlighting the importance of examining the teaching and learning of literacies across formal and informal settings, results offer information about how these pre-service teachers constructed understandings and situated identities (Gee, 1990, 2000-2001) through scaffolding. Pedagogical implications for pre-service teacher education are discussed.

NÉGOCIER LES MONDES , LES MOTS ET LES IDE NTIT ÉS: SOUTIE N À L'APPRE NTISS AGE DES LITT ÉRATIES POUR LES FUTURS ENSEIG NANTS ET LES ENFANTS

RÉSUMÉ. L'objectif de cet article est d'élargir la portée de la théorie socioculturelle de l'enseignement et de l'apprentissage de la littératie. Il fait le compte-rendu des données tirées d'une étude qualitative étayée dans un cadre socioculturel (Rogoff, 1990; Vygotsky, 1986). Pilotée par une communauté universitaire d'Australie, ce projet a suivi un groupe de futurs enseignants participant à des événements de soutien à l'apprentissage de la littératie, telles que des discussions face à face et en ligne ainsi que des expériences de lecture partagée avec des enfants. Soulignant l'importance d'analyser l'enseignement et l'apprentissage de la littératie dans des contextes formels et informels, les résultats présentent des informations sur la manière dont les futurs enseignants élaborent leur compréhension et situent leur identité professionnelle (Gee, 1990, 2000-2001) à l'aide du soutien à l'apprentissage. Les implications pédagogiques pour la formation des futurs enseignants sont exposées.

Over the past two decades, the teaching and learning of literacies have been vigorously debated in academia (Allington, 2006) and across local, national and international media. Public debate, unfortunately, has been dominated by headlines which set back-to-basics against a whole language approach and highlight underachievement in students' literacy performance (Durrant, 2012, 2006; Ivanic, Edwards, Satchwell & Smith, 2007; Smith, 2003). In Australia, initiatives such as the National Inquiry into Literacy Teaching, often referred to as the Nelson Inquiry (Commonwealth of Australia, 2005), the Inquiry into Teacher Education (Commonwealth of Australia, 2007) and the new K-10 Australian Curriculum (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2012) have re-fuelled debates over the teaching and learning of literacies in schools. With increased accountability and performance monitoring both overseas and in Australia, interest in teacher education policy has focussed public inquiry on teacher recruitment and teacher education programmes (Cochran-Smith 2005; Mitchell, Murray & Nuttall, 2006; Smith, 2007).

Recommending that elementary and secondary teachers demonstrate personal skills and knowledge for teaching literacies, most particularly reading, the Nelson Inquiry emphasized the relationship between student literacy achievement and quality teaching. Similarly, the Report on the Inquiry into Teacher Education (Commonwealth of Australia, 2007) equated quality teaching with students' academic standards and placed expectations on universities to improve initial teacher education, particularly through the teaching of reading. Critics argued that both Inquiries employed an outdated language of training reminiscent of a technical model of teacher education (Mitchell et al., 2006). Such a model dismisses the socially constructed nature of literacy (Luke & Freebody, 1999; New London Group, 2000) and privileges a view that literacy skills are value free and seamlessly transferable (Ivanic et al. …

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