Academic journal article Management & Marketing

A Study of the Correlation between Training Administration and Training Motivation

Academic journal article Management & Marketing

A Study of the Correlation between Training Administration and Training Motivation

Article excerpt

Abstract. This study focused on measuring the correlation between training administration and training motivation using self-administered questionnaires obtained from employees working in a military based health organization in Malaysia. The stepwise regression analysis was employed to attain the research objectives. The results showed three important findings: Firstly, support significantly correlated with training motivation. Secondly, assignment insignificantly correlated with training motivation. Thirdly, delivery significantly correlated with training motivation. Statistically, our empirical findings demonstrate that support and delivery were found to be the important predictors of training motivation while assignment was not an important predictor of training motivation in the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implications and conclusion are also elaborated.

Keywords: training administration, support, assignment, delivery, training motivation, Malaysia

1. Introduction

Training is often viewed as a strategic human resource development and management issue in an organisation (Noe, 2010). In the workplace, the various types of on the job and offthe job training programs are planned and implemented by employers to enhance employees' knowledge, skills, abilities (KSAs) and positive attitude in order to support the organizational goals, expectations and needs (Vodde, 2012). In managing training programs, human resource administrators will often work together with line managers to create appropriate training programs and improve the content and methods of training programs. After getting approval from top management, human resource administrators will jointly coordinate with line managers to implement the various types of training for the benefits of the organization and the employees (Maimunah, 2008; Noe et al., 2009; Vodde, 2012). Traditionally, human resource administrators design many types of training programs to develop basic skills and apply them in order to overcome immediate job problems and increase daily job performance. This training approach is suitable to organizations that operate in less competitive environments and market stability (Noe, 2010; Noe et al., 2009). In an era of global competition, most human resource administrators have shifted their paradigms from a traditional based training to achieve organizational strategy and goals (DeSimone et al., 2002; Goldstein and Ford, 2002; Noe, 2010). Under this strategic approach, a traditional based training is viewed as not adequate for enabling employees to cope with current organizational changes (Blanchard and Thacker, 2004). In order to sustain organizational competitiveness, human resource administrators have taken proactive actions to focus on improving intangible assets and human capital such as impart new competencies, change negative attitudes, match knowledge and skills according to organization needs, prepare employees to face new challenges, adapt with sophisticated technologies, do a continuous improvements and promote organizational learning (Blanchard and Thacker, 2004; Noe, 2010). If these training programs are to be properly administered this will help employees to upgrade their capabilities in terms of cognitive, affective, psychomotor and good moral values. Hence, it may lead employees to maintain and support the organizational strategy and goals (Noe, 2010; Nijman et al., 2006).

According to a recent organizational training literature, effective training administration usually consists of three essential dimensions: support, assignment and delivery (Goldstein and Ford, 2002; Saks and Belcourt, 2006; Nijman et al., 2006). Support is generally defined as administering great encouragement to employees to attend training programs, help employees before, during and after the training programs in terms of time, budget and resources, involve employees in decision-making, and guide trainees in applying competencies that they have learned when entering the workplace (DeSimone et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.