Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Modeling the Influence of Group Norms and Self-Regulatory Efficacy on Workplace Deviant Behaviour

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Modeling the Influence of Group Norms and Self-Regulatory Efficacy on Workplace Deviant Behaviour

Article excerpt

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of group norms and self-regulatory efficacy on workplace deviant behaviour. A web-based survey was used to collect data from 217 teaching stafffrom various higher education institutions in Nigeria. The data collected was analysed using Partial Least Squares (PLS) path modeling. As predicted, the path coefficient results supported the direct influence of perceived injunctive norms and self-regulatory efficacy on organisational deviance. Similarly, perceived injunctive norm and self-regulatory efficacy were found to be significant predictors of interpersonal deviance. On the contrary, perceived descriptive norms were not significant predictors of both organisational deviance and interpersonal deviance. In addition, self-regulatory efficacy does not moderate the relationship between perceived descriptive norms and organisational deviance. We also found support for the moderating role of self-regulatory efficacy on the relationship between perceived injunctive norms and dimensions of workplace deviance. The moderating role of self-regulatory efficacy on the relationship between perceived descriptive norms and interpersonal deviance was also supported. Finally, the policy implications of the study are discussed.

Keywords: workplace deviance, perceived group norms, self-regulatory efficacy, social identity theory

1. Introduction

Workplace deviant behaviour is defined as a voluntary behaviour engaged by employee that is contrary to the significant organizational norms and it is considered as a threat to the well-being of an organization and/or its members (Robinson & Bennett, 1995). Workplace deviance is pervasive phenomenon and costly to organisations (Aquino, Galperin, & Bennett, 2004; Lawrence & Robinson, 2007). Researchers have indicated that workplace deviant behaviour is potentially destructive or harmful to both organization and its members (Lawrence & Robinson, 2007; Spector & Fox, 2002). Workplace deviant behaviours violate the significant organizational norms as well as threatening the well-being of individual employees and the effective functioning of organisations (Ackroyd & Thompson, 1999; Bennett & Robinson, 2000, 2003; Fox & Spector, 1999; Fox, Spector, & Miles, 2001; Hollinger & Clark, 1982; Nasir & Bashir, 2012; Robinson & Bennett, 1995; Sackett & DeVore, 2001; Shamsudin, 2003; Vardi & Weitz, 2004; Warren, 2003). For example, workplace deviance construct was reported to decrease labour productivity through absenteeism or lateness, and also damage organization's reputation, (Bowling & Gruys, 2010). It was demonstrated that targets of interpersonal workplace deviance are more likely to experience work-related stress symptoms (e.g. psychological and physical pain), high turnover rate, lost work time, increased fear and insecurity in the workplace, low morale, damaged self-esteem and decreased productivity (Henle, Giacalone, & Jurkiewicz, 2005). Furthermore, it was suggested that victims of workplace deviance are more likely to experience lower job satisfaction in relation to co-workers and supervisors, lower levels of psychological well-being, health satisfaction, relatively higher levels of psychological distress and higher levels of work withdrawal (Martin & Hine, 2005).

Because of its significant costs, conducting a further study on its underlying causes is imperative. Therefore, the present study seeks to extend the existing workplace deviance literature by investigating the influence of group norms and self-regulatory efficacy on workplace deviant behaviour among the teaching stafffrom various higher education institutions in Nigeria. The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. In section 2, we highlighted on the issues in Nigerian higher education and then review the previous works that relate the theoretical constructs. To link these theoretical constructs, we use social learning theory as a basis. …

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