Academic journal article Journal of Advertising Education

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60S and Beyond

Academic journal article Journal of Advertising Education

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60S and Beyond

Article excerpt

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond By Jane Maas (New York, NY, Thomas Dunne Books, 2012; 228 pages; hardcover; ISBN 978-0-312-64023-1; $24.99)

This is an important book for three types of readers: those of us who lived through this historic period in advertising, anyone interested in the history of advertising, and those interested in the nuggets of consumer and advertising insights that are sprinkled throughout the book.

Maas has credentials. She is the co-author with Ken Roman of one of the most read advertising books in the past 25 years: How to Advertise, still in print and still worth reading. She also lived the life of a great copywriter, joining Ogilvy & Mather in 1964. She went on to Wells Rich Greene in 1976, and eventually became president of the New York office of Earle Palmer Brown. Along the way, she headed up her own agency, counting "The Queen of Mean" Leona Hehnsley as a client. The book is worth reading for this chapter alone.

Mad Women is, in many ways, a companion piece to the hit television show Mad Men. As many of us know, Mad Men is only partially correct, and author Maas sets out to give the reader a different and more accurate point of view, especially about how women were treated in the '50s, '60s, and '70s. Shelly Lazarus, Chairman of Ogilvy and Mather Worldwide calls Maas a real-life Peggy Olsen, the rising copywriter of the TV show. Mad Women starts with a typical day for Jane Maas on Madison Avenue in 1967. …

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