Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Registers of Bishop Henry Burghersh, 1320-1342. Vol. III: Memoranda Register Dispensations for Study Cum Ex Eo, Licences for Non-Residence, Testamentary Business, Letters Dimissory, Appointment of Penitentiaries

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Registers of Bishop Henry Burghersh, 1320-1342. Vol. III: Memoranda Register Dispensations for Study Cum Ex Eo, Licences for Non-Residence, Testamentary Business, Letters Dimissory, Appointment of Penitentiaries

Article excerpt

The Registers of Bishop Henry Burghersh, 1320-1342. Vol. III: Memoranda Register Dispensations for Study Cum ex eo, Licences for Non-Residence, Testamentary Business, Letters Dimissory, Appointment of Penitentiaries. Edited by Nicholas Bennett. [Publications of the Lincoln Record Society, Vol. 101.] (Rochester, NY: Boydell & Brewer. 2011. Pp. xxviii, 486. $50.00. ISBN 978-0-9015-3-93-0.)

Henry Burghersh (b. 1290?) probably had a university career before he was named bishop of Lincoln by papal provision in a disputed election in which two local candidates were rejected (he was a secular cleric; the cathe- dral was monastic). Contemporary chroniclers reported unfavorably on the election because of the papal intervention and because he was thought to be too young and inexperienced. Later the appointment was condemned, because Burghersh had sided with Isabella and Mortimer against the king, Edward II. They appointed him treasurer (1327) and chancellor (1328). He was relieved of his office by Edward III, but the king exacted no other penalty for his association with the rebels and subsequently reappointed him treas- urer (1334-37) and then ambassador to the Low Countries to work on a union of European powers against France. Except for two short visits home, he remained abroad until his death.

Burghersh seems to have been an effective administrator of the enormous Diocese of Lincoln that was divided into seventy-five rural deaneries and about 1928 parochial benefices under eight archdeaconries: the counties of Bedford, Buckingham, Leicester, and Oxford; Lincoln (which included the counties of Lincoln and Stow); and Northampton (which included Northampton and Rutland). He had a number of houses within his district that enabled him to move about to carry out the business of the diocese as well as two residences outside the diocese-his castle at Newark and his London house in Holborn. Burghersh had a retinue of household clerks who traveled with him as well as a large group of assistants and officers resident in Lincoln.

Volume III of the edition is Burghersh's memoranda register; volumes I (LRS 87) and II (LRS 90) contain institutions to benefices in the eight archdeaconries and collations of cathedral dignities and prebends. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.