Academic journal article Journal of Community Positive Practices

Workforce Cost Effects on Productivity, Quality and Satisfaction in Organisations

Academic journal article Journal of Community Positive Practices

Workforce Cost Effects on Productivity, Quality and Satisfaction in Organisations

Article excerpt

Abstract. Retaining employees definitely saves an organisation money, and workforce planning could assist in retention of employees. Global pressure on organisations to stay competitive necessitates change while stakeholders demand quality and cost effective products. On the other hand competitors around the world are demanding level playing fields across cultures. Productivity, quality and customer satisfaction have also contributed to a rethinking of the shape and the nature of organisations. A culturally diverse workforce has been a reality in New Zealand for decades. The empirical research reported on in 2010 in this paper sought to discover informed industry direction from HR practitioners as to what their profile ought to be in 2020 and what organisations should do in this regard to be sensitive to a diverse workforce and to be prepared for the future .

1. Introduction

In any country the anticipated changes in the business environment are of great concern for managers and business owners. The role of human resource (HR) departments in organisational development and the management of cultural changes in order to stay globally competitive is the reason for the undertaking of this empirical research (Du Plessis, 2012). There is also a shiftin countries globally, including in small countries such as New Zealand, by management to integrate all resources and forces into an appropriate strategy. Social benefits in a country where unemployment is low are not abused because people are working and not looking to the State for support. To keep unemployment figures low, organisations have to look at retaining their workforce and keep their labour turnover as low as possible. Some solutions are identified and presented in this article (Du Plessis, Paine, Botha, 2012).

The central figures in organisational change are managers. As change agents they have a proactive role in anticipating and shaping the environment for change. Line managers must also be experienced in more than one field. Respondents supported this important role of managers as change agents by implementing HR programmes for organisational development, cultural as well as organisational changes. An enormous increase of 21% for 2020 in the importance of line management's role is anticipated by the respondents compared to5% in 2000 and 26% in 2010.

The traditional roles of managers and the roles and responsibilities of human resources managers must change in the future. As change agents and leaders they will have to implement all the programmes and practices for these changes to stay globally competitive (Du Plessis, 2012).The empirical research reported on in this paper sought to discover the direction of informed industry from HR practitioners as to what the profile of the HR practitioner ought to be in 2020 and what organisations should do in this regard to be sensitive to culture diversity in New Zealand.

2. Theoretical background

2.1. Workforce Planning

Workforce planning is one of the most important issues in which human resource (HR) professionals/ practitioners are involved. It is getting more complex and difficult for managers to plan their workforces. It is estimated that in 2030 there will be another 1.5 billion people on our planet and that the populations will, on average, be much older. These population changes, along with other factors, will determine the future growth of the world economy in which countries such as Romania and New Zealand take part (Härtel & Fujimoto, 2010). The task of actually implementing workforce planning is daunting because it is so difficult to define. It is also known as employment planning or HR planning. This type of planning is at the operational level where it is concerned with detailed forecasts of employee supply and demand.

Despite the expected rapid increase in the global population, the war for talent is intensifying globally every year to enable organisations to remain competitive and thus sustainable. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.