Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

"Lean In" Closer: Tips for Preparing Our Future Nurses

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

"Lean In" Closer: Tips for Preparing Our Future Nurses

Article excerpt

THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF LEADERSHIP ADVICE FOR WOMEN, YOUNG AND NOT-SO-YOUNG. There is also no shortage of leadership advice for nurses. But put the combination together, which we must - for by far the largest percentage of nurses are women - and we often witness a far larger percentage of nurses who neither lean in nor stand tall. How can we help future generations of nurses, our students, learn the lessons espoused by Sheryl Sandberg in her recent book Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead?

Sandberg urges women to be more assertive in their professional ambitions. Isn't this what we want for our students? For years we have encouraged nurses to strive to reach the top within health care and academic institutions. As nurse leaders, we have hopes and dreams that our students will exceed our expectaations and our accomplishments. Our students' ability to exceed our successes, to be better than us, is the ultimate testimony to our excellence in teaching and mentoring.

Sandberg's work has sparked debate, with most of the strong reactions from women themselves. Criticisms abound, with some considered emphasis on Sandberg's encouragement for women to adapt to and join the world of work by adopting the views and behaviors of the dominant work culture, that of men in the workplace.

At a retreat last weekend, I asked a nonrandom convenience sample of women faculty their reactions to the Sandberg message. Although none had read the book, they considered the tendency to quickly judge others one of the major drawbacks for women. We need to teach our students how to be nonjudgmental of the diabetic patient who is noncompliant; of the unwed teenage mother; of obese patients who risk their health; of all patients who complicate their lives and health with unhealthy behaviors; and, of course, to be nonjudgmental of other nurses. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.