Academic journal article Marlowe Studies

Fore-Words

Academic journal article Marlowe Studies

Fore-Words

Article excerpt

We are proud to launch a historic enterprise, the first serial academic publication devoted exclusively to the works of Christopher Marlowe. We solicit essays on scholarly topics directly related to the author and his role in the literary culture of his time. Especially welcome are studies of the plays and poetry; their sources; relations to genre; lines of influence; classical, medieval, and continental contexts; performance and theater history; textual studies; and Marlowe's professional milieu and place in early modern English poetry, drama, and culture. We offer essays that represent a cross-section of Marlowe studies as they currently stand, and although they are not all devoted to any one theme, they bear relationships to one another that suggest the ensuing organizing principle.

Jeffrey Rufo's "Marlowe's Minions" analyzes the politics of Edward II and The Massacre at Paris, exploring critical responses to the issue of same-sex relationships in both plays. R. Carter Hailey's "The Publication Date of Marlowe's Massacre " provides a natural link, although the subject is quite different. This bibliographical study explores the specialized subject of paper types in ascertaining a fact that has long eluded scholars: which year the undated quarto of this play was actually published. Our next essay is about the world of books and publishing as well. In "The 1663 Doctor Faustus and the Royalist Marlowe," Meghan C. Andrews speculates that the play's next publication after the B-text of 1616, in the second half of the seventeenth century during the early years of the Restoration, was politically informed and motivated. The next essay is also on Faustus, Marlowe's most studied and performed work. Barbara Parker's "'Cursèd Necromancy'" suggests that the play's obsession with necromancy reflects standard Protestant polemic in the sixteenth century that Catholicism was itself demonic, its rituals shamanistic, and its practitioners actually purveyors of magic, divorced from the Word. The next pair of essays explores intertextual connections between Marlowe and William Shakespeare (and, to some extent, Ben Jonson). James Biester's "A Storm Brewing" reinvigorates the idea of a relationship between Faustus and The Tempest, and Sara Munson Deats's "Mars or Gorgon?" explores the possible influence of Tamburlaine on Henry V. The next two pieces explore and even catalogue tendencies and motifs in the corpus: Lisa Hopkins's "Playing with Matches" examines Marlowe's consistent and frequent use of the motif of fire in the plays and poetry, and Douglas Bruster's "Christopher Marlowe and the Verse/Prose Bilingual System" iterates and categorizes the relatively few instances of prose in the plays and finds symmetries and confluences in them. …

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