Academic journal article Journal of Media Research

Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind Intercultural Cooperation and Its Importance for Survival

Academic journal article Journal of Media Research

Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind Intercultural Cooperation and Its Importance for Survival

Article excerpt

Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind Intercultural Cooperation and its Importance for Survival Authors: Geert Hofstede, Gert Jan Hofstede and Michael Minkov Humanitas Publishing House, 2012

An important editorial appearance in the field of management is the book entitled Cultures and Organizations: Soßware of the Mind - Intercultural Cooperation and its Importance for Survival, published in Romanian (translation in 2012 by Humanitas publisher (the book was originally published in English in 2010)

The authors of the book are Geert Hofstede, Gert Jan Hofstede and Michael Minkov. While the other two authors may be less known to the Romanian readers, Geert Hofstede is one of the "classics of organizational culture analysis". Hofstede's international study on national and organizational culture put his name among the best known authors of managerial theories.

The beauty of Hofstede's model lies in the possibility of conducting comparative analysis based on six cultural dimensions. Romania is included among the countries in the study, with interesting results from a managerial reform perspective in all types of organizations: public, private, and non-profit.

The book is structured in four main parts: the concept of culture, the cultural dimensions of the national culture, culture in organizations, and the effects of cultural differences. The book is fundamental for both researchers and ordinary readers who are interested in deciphering the elements that make up an organizations culture or a nations culture for that matter.

The authors argue that culture is a type of mental programming that affects the behavior of human communities in general, in a more or less predictable manner. Mental programming is structured along three hierarchical levels: personality (specific to the individual), culture (specific to groups or communities) and human nature (a universal level). …

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