Academic journal article College and University

Applying FERPA to Dual Credit Students, ID Photos in the Yearbook, and Sister Institutions and MOUs

Academic journal article College and University

Applying FERPA to Dual Credit Students, ID Photos in the Yearbook, and Sister Institutions and MOUs

Article excerpt

FERPA Q&A is a compilation of questions posed to LeRoy Rooker, AACRAO Senior Fellow and former director of the Department of Educations Family Policy Compliance Office. To submit your ferpa-related question for the next issue of College and University, e-mail Jessica Montgomery at jessicam@aacrao.org.

Our community college has entered into the world of dual credit with local high schools. As such, we often have parents who call wanting information on their high school student. Our college has taken the stance that once [high school students] begin college, they are held to the same standard as the college students. Our policy doesn't state any special accommodationsfor high school students, and in fact, we've instituted a ferpa permission form that the student can sign that gives the parents permission to speak to us about their college matters. If that is on file, we speak with the parents... [However], someone from our state governing body said that according to ferpa, we could speak to the parents regarding the high school students' college records. Can you help explain what the college requirements might be so that we manage this issue correctly ?

FERPA applies to both elementary/secondary schools as well as postsecondary institutions. FERPA rights belong to the parents until a student turns eighteen, or attends a postsecondary institution at any age. Thus, ferpa rights transfer to a student, including dual enrolled, who is attending a postsecondary institution. Generally a signed consent is required to share student education records with another party (See section 99.30 of the ferpa regulations). However, there are exceptions to the signed consent requirement under which an institution may, but is not required to, disclose education records without the consent of the student. One of those exceptions is to parents of a dependent student. This exception is found in section 99.31(a)(8) and conditions any disclosure on the student being claimed on the parent s income tax return. If this condition is met, the institution may disclose any information from the students education records to the parents. I hope this is helpful. If you have the 2012 AACRAO FERPA Guide you can find the latest ferpa regulations in Appendix B, starting on page 151. …

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