Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science

Condom and Hormonal Contraceptive Use by Young Women: An Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Assessment

Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science

Condom and Hormonal Contraceptive Use by Young Women: An Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Assessment

Article excerpt

The current study was a test of the information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model (J. D. Fisher & Fisher, 2000) regarding hormonal contraceptive use, condom use, and dual protection (i.e., the 2 simultaneously). Two-hundred and 67 sexually active women between the ages of 17 and 22 were recruited in 1st year undergraduate classes. Regression results provided support for the 1MB model; particularly the impact of motivational constructs (i.e., subjective norms and preventive attitudes) and behavioural skills were consistent predictors of behaviour. Although information, per se, was not a strong predictor of behavioural skills and did not predict behaviour directly, measurement caveats with the information measure prevent more definitive conclusions. The results of this study support the IMB model as a paradigm for explaining and predicting sexual health behaviour of young women. Implications for sexual health interventions are an increased focus on psychological variables in the IMB model, such as the development of positive attitudes and self efficacy along with the understanding of the personal benefits in engaging in dual-protective behaviours with regard to prevention of sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.

Keywords: information-motivation-behavioral skills, condom use, contraceptive use, dual protection

Young women and men are frequently the focus of sexual health interventions and research (Boyce, Doherty, Fortin, & MacKinnon, 2003; Darroch, Frost, & Singh, 2002; Guttmacher Institute, 2011; Kirby, Laris, & Rolleri, 2007). Sexual debut typically occurs in the teenage years and almost half of Canadian youth report being sexually active by age 16 or 17 (Boyce et al., 2003; Reissing, Andruff, & Wentland, 2012; SIECCAN, 2012). Adolescence is an ideal period to teach sexual health knowledge and impart safer sex skills in an effort to promote positive outcomes (e.g., self-esteem, rewarding sexual relationships, respect for self and others) and prevent negative outcomes (e.g., unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections [STIs]/HIV, sexual coercion; Health Canada, 2008) because "prevention" is a better health promotion strategy than "cure" (Card, Lessard, & Benner, 2007). Creating healthy sexual habits before sexual debut is prudent relative to attempting to change unhealthy sexual habits after they are established, The consequences of unprotected sexual behaviour are also especially critical for young women: The results of unintended pregnancy tend to be more severe for youth (Hoffman, 2008; Paranjothy, Broughton, Adappa, & Fone, 2009), and young women are consistently overrepresented in human papillomavirus (HPV) and chlamydia infection rates, demonstrating a higher incidence of STIs than men of similar ages (Health Canada, 2007). Therefore, it is important to increase protective behaviours, such as the use of hormonal contraception, condoms, and dual protection (i.e., use of hormonal contraception plus barrier methods), among emerging adults, particularly young women.

Hormonal contraceptives, particularly oral contraceptive pills, are widely used by young women (W. A. Fisher & Black, 2007) and are highly effective in pregnancy prevention (Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, 2007). Among Canadian female high school students, oral contraceptive use increases with age, with 54% of sexually active Grade 11 students using oral contraceptives at last intercourse (Boyce et al., 2003). In the United States, oral contraceptives remain the most popular form of pregnancy prevention. Of those under age 20 who use contraception, 54% report using the pill (Mosher & Jones, 2010). Positive attitudes toward hormonal contraceptives, intention to avoid pregnancy, self-efficacy for contraceptive use, and increased sexual health knowledge contribute to higher rates of use (Alford, 2003). However, women who rely solely on hormonal contraceptives to protect against unintended pregnancy are not protected against STIs/HIV unless they also use a barrier method. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.