Academic journal article Career Development Quarterly

Adlerian Lifestyle, Stress Coping, and Career Adaptability: Relationships and Dimensions

Academic journal article Career Development Quarterly

Adlerian Lifestyle, Stress Coping, and Career Adaptability: Relationships and Dimensions

Article excerpt

In the new millennium, workers are vested with the responsibility of managing their own careers. Additionally, workers are expected to engage in the continual development of skills applicable across various work environments. With this need for continual development come frequent work transitions and the need for building career adaptability. Stress can ensue from this constant need to update skills and transition to new work environments. The purpose of this study was to explore relationships among Adlerian lifestyle attributes, stress coping, and career adaptability. Canonical correlation was used to explore the relationships among these variables. The results indicated that 3 dimensions were significant and interpretable: socially attuned, compliant, and impassive. The results partially support the hypothesis that high feelings of belongingness are associated with high coping resources. However, the results also highlight that a high need for acceptance from others and for following social norms may impede the development of career adaptability.

Keywords: stress coping, career adaptability, Adlerian lifestyle, work transition

With the advent of the world economy and postindustrial society (Bell, 1973), workers began experiencing a need to adapt to the new paradigm of employment instability. Evidence of this transformation has become more commonplace in the United States (Uchetelle, 2006) and has also been the subject of recent films (e.g., Up in the Air [Dubiecke, Reitman, Reitman, Clifford, & Reitman, 2009], The Company Men [Polstein, Weinstein, Wells, & Wells, 2010]). The 20th-century social contract between industry and the worker was discarded (Uchetelle, 2006). Hall (1996) proclaimed that the career had ended and that the protean career had taken its place as the de facto career paradigm of the 21st century. Arthur and Rousseau (1996) called for workers to develop a boundaryless mind-set, meaning that employees must be both psychologically and environmentally open to change and learning that cross old organizational boundaries. Vocational psychology and career counseling responded to these changes in the work structure by creating theories to help clients reconceptualize work life (e.g., rich context approach [Blustein, 2006], happenstance theory [Krumboltz, 2009], career construction theory [Savickas, 2011]). These theories have a common theme that workers must be lifelong learners and able to adapt continually to the evolving work environment.

Career Adaptability and Stress Coping

Savickas (2011) focused specifically on the need for workers to be adaptive and used Super and Knasel's (1981) ideas concerning career maturity. Super and Knasel wrote that career maturity was not an accurate description for adults in the process of career transition, and they suggested the term career adaptability to explain adult career adaptation. Savickas (2011) incorporated many of Super's (1990) ideas into career construction theory but focused on the central construct of adaptation. He described an adaptability model for "mastering vocational developmental tasks, coping with occupational transitions, and adjusting to work traumas and contingencies" (Savickas, 2011, p. 3). Savickas ( 1997) discussed career adaptability from a functionalist perspective and stated that people adapt at work to enact their individual self-concepts. Through four dimensions of career adaptability (concern, control, curiosity, and confidence), Savickas (2011) described the adaptation of individuals to diverse work experiences. A consortium of researchers (Savickas & Porfeli, 2012) constructed the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) to measure the four dimensions. These dimensions are the resources that people use to explore work and make adaptive transitions. Although Savickas and Porfeli (2012) explained these adapt-abilitiesthrough specific trait dimensions, they posited that individuals develop "resources for coping with current and anticipated tasks, transitions, [and] traumas in their occupational roles" (p. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.