Academic journal article International Journal of Marketing Studies

What Affects Mobile Application Use? the Roles of Consumption Values

Academic journal article International Journal of Marketing Studies

What Affects Mobile Application Use? the Roles of Consumption Values

Article excerpt

Abstract

Today, mobile application (App) is a new emerging mobile technology and has been widely used. This new mobile artifact not only overturns the traditional business model of mobile industry, but also creates new avenues of mobile market opportunities. Although mobile pay-per-use services have attracted increased attention in recent years, few studies have provided limited insight into mobile technology adoption in pay-per-use services. In this study, we examine the determinants of behavioral intention of Apps users based on the theory of consumption values, and explore the roles of these values in mobile Apps context. Hypothesis testing was performed with structural equation modeling (SEM) on data collected from 282 mobile Apps users. The results reveal that consumption values significantly affect consumer behavioral intention to use mobile Apps. Among them, epistemic and motional values have stronger relationships with behavioral intention. Moreover, conditional value influences mobile App users' behavioral intention via the mediation of other consumption values (functional, social, emotional, and epistemic value). Finally, implications of the findings and areas for future research are discussed.

Keywords: consumption values, mobile application, perceived value, behavioral intention

1. Introduction

In 2007, the appearance of iPhone fired up the whirlwind of mobile application (App), and drove mobile application stores up and flourishing. Apple's App Store created new mobile value-added services (VAS), moreover, Apple boasts it as a new service type to meet the needs of mobile phone users-"whatever you want to do, there is an App for it" (Topology Research Institute: TRI, 2010). This new service type not only overturns the traditional business model of mobile industry, but also creates new avenues of mobile market opportunities. According to Gartner (2011) forecasting, worldwide mobile application store revenue is projected to surpass $15.1 billion in 2011, both from end users buying applications and applications themselves generating advertising for their developers. Besides, by the end of 2014, Gartner (2011) also forecast over 185 billion applications will have been downloaded from mobile App stores since the launch of the first one in July 2008. Accordingly, Apps are being seen as a great opportunity of new revenue source in the mobile communication sector. While App has received wide attention, it is extremely important to understand the consumers' perception of Apps usage, especially for those parties who would like to get the profit from Apps.

Although mobile pay-per-use services have attracted increased attention in recent years, few studies have provided limited insight into mobile technology adoption in pay-per-use services. Referring to previous research, there are many theories or models applied to IS researches. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) , Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991), Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw, 1989) and Information Diffusion Theory (IDT) (Rogers, 1995). They are widely applied to investigate the adoption intention and usage behavior of IS users (Bruner, 2005; Hung, Ku, & Chang, 2003; M. C. Lee, 2009). The validity and explanatory power of these models have been examined across many systems and contexts (King & He, 2006), but in most contexts, models did not address the financial, social desirability, quality, emotional, and context-specific dimensions in a unified model (Turel, Serenko, & Bontis, 2010). Much research in the marketing and IS domain show that perceived customer value is an important factor in users' decision processes in pay-per-user service behavior (H. W. Kim, Chan, & Gupta, 2007; Turel, Serenko, & Bontis, 2007). Moreover, consumer-behavior literature also shows that perceived value, which may be conceptualized before a product is bought or used, both strongly and stably predicts consumers' purchasing intentions (Eggert & Ulaga, 2002; Sweeney & Soutar, 2001). …

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