Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Le 'Martyre D'amour' Dans Les Romans En Vers De la Seconde Moitié Du Douzième À la Fin Du Treizième Siècle

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Le 'Martyre D'amour' Dans Les Romans En Vers De la Seconde Moitié Du Douzième À la Fin Du Treizième Siècle

Article excerpt

Claude Machabey-Besanceney, Le 'Martyre d'amour' dans les romans en vers de la seconde moitié du douzième à la fin du treizième siècle (Paris: Honoré Champion, 2012). 360 pp. ISBN 978-2-7453-2245-6. euro80.00.

Claude Machabey-Besanceney's book is an interesting addition to scholarship on medieval French verse romance. She argues that, within that genre, a writer's feelings of love give rise to textual creation, a phenomenon first seen in troubadour lyric. For Machabey-Besanceney, the figure of the 'romancier amant' is central, as the male writer is first a lover: when he lacks the love object, however, his energies are displaced into writing. The book is divided chronologically. The first part, 'La Langue d'amour', contains three chapters. The first offers a useful if rapid overview of discourses of love before the twelfth century, starting from Plato and moving through Ovid and the Arabic tradition. The second chapter focuses on the troubadours, whose work MachabeyBesanceney treats as a part of the prehistory of verse romance rather than in dialogue with it. Her analysis might have benefited from familiarity with recent troubadour scholarship, for example the work of Jean-Charles Huchet and Sarah Kay, which has focused principally on the troubadours' parody, wordplay, and, crucially, the intended male recipients frequently addressed in tornadas. This research throws a wholly different light upon the narrative voice - and his or her stance towards the avowed lover - in those poems, arguing that love is a fictional creation. Indeed, these works challenge Machabey-Besanceney's depiction of love as safe, heterosexual, and always leading to writing. The third chapter discusses the reception of classical themes, focusing on the way these romances situate themselves within a wider tradition of transmission. Machabey-Besanceney argues in her second part, 'En quête du moi', that verse romance creates a newly subjective depiction of the narrator whose love is unrequited. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.