Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Assessing the Role of School Management Committees (SMCs) in Improving Quality Teaching and Learning in Ashanti Mampong Municipal Basic Schools

Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Assessing the Role of School Management Committees (SMCs) in Improving Quality Teaching and Learning in Ashanti Mampong Municipal Basic Schools

Article excerpt

Abstract

The study sought to assess the role of School Management Committees (SMCs) in improving quality teaching and learning in Ashanti Mampong Municipal Township Basic Junior High Schools through the views of head teachers, teachers and SMC Members. The design adopted for the study was a descriptive survey. A simple random sampling method was used to select a sample size of thirty (30) respondents. Questionnaire was used to collect (ed) data from the respondents, validated by the researchers and analyzed by the use of descriptive statistics. The findings indicated that SMCs were ineffective in the monitoring and supervision of head teachers', teacher's and pupils' attendance. Even though SMC's are not doing enough to assist teachers to improve teaching and learning, they are seen as very effective in solving school community relations since SMCs are relatively on task on the issue of serving as a vehicle for promoting community participation in the provision of quality education. Finally, it was recommended that much effort is needed to be done by SMCs in the Ashanti Mampong Municipal to raise the standard of basic education. It is hoped that the findings will serve as tools for change of practice of supervision of all stakeholders in the quality of teaching and learning in basic schools.

Keywords: quality teaching and learning, SMCs, assessing, school management, education reform, programme evaluation

INTRODUCTION

Past and present governments have all shared the sentiments that a vital part of a country's infrastructure is its educational system, for education has the ability to shape a nation's cultural character as well as ensure its long-term social and economic well being. The Government of Ghana has shown enormous commitment to the achievement of "Education of All" (EFA) through its Poverty Reduction Strategy. (Education Sector Report, 2004; Government of Ghana (GOG) 2004). Poverty Reduction Strategy (GPRS) is the provision of quality education. Quality is simply defined as fitness for purpose (National Universities Commission (NUC) 2002). This definition implies that quality in education could be regarded as the ability of an institution to fulfill its mission or programme of study.

The overall goal of the Ministry of Education is to provide quality and relevant education for all Ghanaians to enable them acquire skills which will make them functionally literate and productive for the rapid socio- economic development of the country. Over the years, many efforts have been made through educational reforms to improve the quality of education and make it more responsive to the needs and aspirations of the Ghanaian society, Nevertheless, recent results of the Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE) show that standards are still falling. (Akyeampong, 2002)

Ghana's educational system has experienced a number of challenging reforms, such as the 1987 reform with its modifications, and the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) programme, in 1994 that tried to address them. The low academic performance of pupils in Mathematics and Science, were attributed to inadequate provision of teaching and learning materials, ineffective school management, poor community participation, poor monitoring and evaluation, poor supervision, pupil and teacher absenteeism and inadequate supply of text books. Currently, there is a general feeling that the education system in Ghana is falling continuously, especially at the basic level. (Akyeampong, Fobih and Koomson, 1999). Experts have attributed this pattern to the ineffectiveness of the School Management Committees (SMCs), and had questioned the essence of their existence. In Ghana, SMCs were among the number of interventions adopted by the Government of Ghana under the Ghana Education Act of 1994 in all basic schools which aimed at;

1) Strengthening community participation

2) Mobilization for education delivery, as well as

3) Improving quality teaching and learning (GES, SMC/ PTA Handbook, 2001. …

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