Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Elitist Notions and the Emotions of Primary School Teaching in Zimbabwe: Pre-Service Teachers' Perspectives

Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Elitist Notions and the Emotions of Primary School Teaching in Zimbabwe: Pre-Service Teachers' Perspectives

Article excerpt

Abstract

This study sought to explain why post-Advanced level students were resisting training to become primary school teachers. Up-to-date information with regard to pre service student teachers is of great significance to teacher educators who as developers of teacher education programmes ought to appreciate the concerns of prospective student. The data to address the inquiry was collected by means of the descriptive survey method comprised of a questionnaire, un-structured and structured interview questions. The sample in the study consisted of a cohort group of 54 post-sixth form student teachers who were the first group to pioneer a preservice primary teacher education degree programme , 11 teacher educators and 10 school based mentors participating in the implementation of the programme. The results of the study indicate that a complex cluster of factors comprised of pre-programme beliefs and values, financial stress, in adequate teaching skills and competencies and lack of emotional support systems cumulatively induce socio-emotional dilemmas for post Sixth form student teachers. In light of the above this study proposes a major overhaul in the conceptualisation, design and delivery of post-A level form pre-service primary teacher education programmes. First, at individual levels, primary school teaching should be regarded as problematic and a socio-moral dilemma for post-Advanced level student teachers. In light of the above, designers of initial teacher education programmes should incorporate concern-based principles in the design and implementation of initial teacher education programmes. At policy formulation level, there is need to harmonise teacher education policies to offset discriminatory financial practices against one set of student teachers.

Keywords: post-a level graduates, emotional dilemma. teaching, primary schools; Zimbabwe.

INTRODUCTION

Designing and sustaining educational innovations has become elusive in post independence African countries. In Zimbabwe, the education landscape is strewn with failed educational innovations (Jansen, 1991). One of the areas that have experienced innovation failures is teacher education Mswazie and Gamira, 2011). Previously, the Presidential Commission on Education and Training Report (1999) had revealed that all is not well in teacher education by reporting that the general public was increasingly becoming disillusioned by the misbehaviour and misconduct of post-independent graduate teachers in Zimbabwe. Similarly, in South Africa the then Minister of Education, Naledi Pandor had this to say: "Why are teachers not teaching any more?"(Mail and Guardian, February 2008), an indication that all is not well both the teaching profession and teacher education. Interestingly, teachers' colleges in Zimbabwe have increasingly reported great feats of academic achievements by graduating teachers with most colleges reporting nearly an average of 98% pass rates among graduating teachers (Masvingo Teachers College 2002-2004). In view of the above, this study sought to understand and explain why primary teaching was increasingly being given a wide berth by post-Sixth form student teachers. More specifically, sought to identify pre-course and in-course barriers that were turning away pre-service students from primary school teaching. It is hypothesized that internal and external factors to the programme may have induced student teachers' attitudes towards primary teaching.

BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

The pre-service primary teacher education degree programme can be better appreciated in the context of global and local pressures. Globally, the emergence the quality and school improvement programme movements directly or indirectly influenced local educational discourses. On one hand the appointment of the Presidential Commission on Education and Training (1998) and the subsequent report (Nziramasanga Report, 1999) could be regarded as a paradigm shift in the provision of educational services. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.