Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Video-Recorded Simulated Patient Interactions: Can They Help Develop Clinical and Communication Skills in Today's Learning Environment?

Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Video-Recorded Simulated Patient Interactions: Can They Help Develop Clinical and Communication Skills in Today's Learning Environment?

Article excerpt

It is difficult to provide real-world learning experiences for students to master clinical and communication skills. The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel instructional method using self- and peer-assessment, reflection, and technology to help students develop effective interpersonal and clinical skills. The teaching method is described by the constructivist learning theory and incorporates the use of educational technology. TEACHING METHOD: The learning activities were incorporated into the pre-clinical didactic curriculum. The students participated in two video-recording assignments and performed self-assessments on each and had a peer-assessment on the second video-recording. ASSESSMENT: The learning activity was evaluated through the self- and peer-assessments and an instructor-designed survey. This evaluation identified several themes related to the assignment, student performance, clinical behaviors and establishing rapport. Overall the students perceived that the learning activities assisted in the development of clinical and communication skills prior to direct patient care. CONCLUSION: The use of video recordings of a simulated history and examination is a unique learning activity for preclinical PT students in the development of clinical and communication skills. J Allied Health 2013; 42(2):e37-e44

CURRENT ACCREDITATION standards for physical therapy (PT) education include the development of clinical skills to perform safe and effective patient examinations and treatments along with the communication skills necessary for successful patient and professional interactions.1 These skills include the ability to listen actively to form an accurate diagnosis, demonstrate empathy, develop rapport, and convey treatment plans using patient-friendly language. Building these skills is crucial to improving patient satisfaction and decreasing medical errors and medical malpractice claims.2-4 However, PT faculty often find it difficult to offer pre-clinical learning activities using actual patients. Recruiting large volumes of consenting patients who are willing to be examined or treated by students is difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Finding the space and time for this type of interaction with large numbers of students and patients is a challenge as well. Even when space is available, faculty may not feel direct one-on-one student observations of these patient interactions is the best use of classroom time. These issues related to space, time, and recruitment, however, can be overcome through the creative use of teaching technology, video-recording and patient simulation, which can remove the need for realtime patient interactions. The purpose of this case study is to describe a novel, interactive teaching method that allowed preclinical PT students to create, view, and reflect upon a video-recorded simulated patient history and physical examination.

Educational Theory

This educational intervention was guided by constructivistlearning theory, one of the seminal theories driving educational practice today. According to constructivist learning theory, students must be provided opportunities to explore, think, and reflect while interacting with their environment and leveraging their own experiences to create new meaning.5 As students take an active role in and responsibility for their learning, instructors function as facilitators who assist students in developing understanding.6 As facilitators, instructors can require students to complete self- and peer-assessments, a teaching method grounded in the constructivist theories of active learning and adult learning.5 With self-assessment, students are encouraged to consciously reflect on their own learning and how to improve; through peer-assessment, students assist each other in improving skills.5

Instructional technologies can foster constructivist educational principles by giving learners personal control and fostering authentic learning environments. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.