Academic journal article The Hymn

Letter to the Editor

Academic journal article The Hymn

Letter to the Editor

Article excerpt

August 19, 2013

A response to a review of my article in Worship 86.5, "Why Do People Sing?" by Stephanie A. Budwey in The Hymn, Winter, 2013, 37-38.

1) "William Smith considers the appropriateness of singing lament in worship. ..." My article has nothing to do with "appropriateness"; it is about the possibility of sung lament-not whether grieving people may sing, but whether they can and do sing. 2) ". . . in worship." Lament is not sung anywhere. While people caught up in grief may express that grief in various ways, they do not, cannot, sing. Biblical lament psalms are the product of non-grieving poets. Vicariously sung in the Second Temple by Levitical singers, they were indeed sad songs. Why was a given psalm sung? If, for instance, we may believe the Mishna, a lament psalm (Ps. 94) was sung at morning sacrifice on the fourth morning of every week-woi because someone was grieving, but because it was the fourth morning of the week. Psalm 94 had become a liturgical proper. As such, it did not function as lament. 3) Budwey: ". . . of singing lament," "that lament should not be sung [italics mine]. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.