Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Economics and Management Sciences

The Role of Agricultural Growth on Millenium Development Goals in Kenya: A Strategy of Poverty Reduction

Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Economics and Management Sciences

The Role of Agricultural Growth on Millenium Development Goals in Kenya: A Strategy of Poverty Reduction

Article excerpt

Abstract

Agricultural is the backbone of Kenyan economy. Its growth is a prerequisite for rural development, hence poverty reduction. The agricultural sector is required to absorb an increasing number of employees and income generation of the people occupied in the agricultural sector, hence increasing the purchasing power of the people. This paper examines the role of agriculture on millennium development growth in Kenya. Kenya being a developing country has developed millennium goals to achieve in vision 2030 and it is in ground this paper wants to look at the role of agricultural growth in achieving those visions. In this paper data from Africa development indicators from World Bank are considered for graphical analysis to study the trend and annual pattern of behavior which supports the hypothesis of the paper that agricultural growth is important on achieving the goals. On the basis of the research findings agriculture sector is an important player in helping Kenya in achieving its millennium goals. Based on the participation of all parties involved eliminating the challenges that may face it, and benefits all citizens and the nation. It is expected that this study will benefit the government and the parties concern to ensure that the millennium goals are achieved and more so the improving of living standards of Kenyans and academicians in filling the knowledge gap and lay foundation for further research.

Keywords: millenium development goals, poverty, poverty eradication, agricultural growth.

INTRODUCTION

Agricultural growth is a prerequisite for rural development, hence poverty reduction. The agricultural sector is required to absorb an increasing number of employees and income generation of the people occupied in the agricultural sector, hence increasing the purchasing power of the people. The agricultural growth has to be attained through the concomitant process: an increase in the total employment capacity and an increase in the efficiency of production i.e. the added value of production per unit of labour. Broad based agricultural growth in low income countries is essential to reach the millennium development goals (MDGs) of halving the number of people in extreme poverty and cutting hunger in half by 2015. More over agriculture is a crucial sector for realizing the (MDGs) of gender equality and environmental sustainability nowhere are these challenges greater than in sub-Saharan Africa where the number of poor people increased by 34% between 1990 and 2000 World Bank Development Report 2002 pp.24.

Agricultural growth contributes to the MDGs through improving people's access to more and better quality food, raising farm incomes, creating employment on and off of the farm empowering poor and marginalized groups including women, it can also promote the sustainable management of natural resources.

Agricultural growth is yet to make large strides in other parts of the world especially in sub-Saharan Africa, agricultural growth has spurred overall economic growth and successfully reduced poverty in Chile, Ghana, India, Thailand and Vietnam. Rapid agricultural growth is essential if the world is to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the coming decade. Therefore, this paper argues that if Sub-Saharan Africa and Kenya in particular is to achieve the first goal of MDGs which is poverty alienation then, the country must reorganize and reorganize the agricultural sector to grow substantially.

There are large differences in standard of living across the globe. Gross national income (GNI) per capita which measures the average income of residents of an economy, ranges from a few hundred dollars a year in the poorest countries to more than $ 40,000 a year in the richest, countries of the first world.

Although 85% of the world's populations live in developing countries their residents receive about 46% of global income in 2005. (World Bank Development Report, 2002). The World Bank classifies countries according to their average income in their GNI per capita; countries with average in incomes of less than $10,752 in 2005 are classified developing (low and middle income economies). …

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