Academic journal article International Education Studies

Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of and Technology Competency at Creating and Using E-Picture Books

Academic journal article International Education Studies

Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of and Technology Competency at Creating and Using E-Picture Books

Article excerpt

Abstract

This study investigated pre-service teachers' perception of and technology competency in creating and using e-picture books in their future classrooms. Participants were 114 pre-service teachers in a required Early Childhood Education undergraduate course at a mid-western university in the United States. As part of the course assignments, participants created an e-picture book using PowerPoint and participated in an online survey through Qualtrics. The questionnaire consisted of three parts with questions about the teachers' perspectives on technology use, the teachers' recognition of technology competency, and their beliefs about e-picture book use for their teaching career. The collected quantitative data were analyzed through the analysis software provided by Qualtrics and qualitative data were analyzed according to coding methods suggested by Huberman and Miles (1994). Findings implied that instruction in creating e-picture books using PowerPoint may help pre-service teachers understand the necessity of technology-supported material and technology-supported intervention in emergent literacy. These results can be used to further improve teacher education and to activate technology-supported emergent literacy education. Suggestions for future research are discussed.

Keywords: e-picture book, literacy education, pre-service teachers, perception, technology competency

1. Introducation

According to the U.S. Common Core State Standards for English language arts and literacy, "college students should use technology and digital media strategically and capably. For instance, they can be familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools and mediums and can select and use those best suited to their communication goals" (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010, p. 7). Many educators have focused on the topic of how to use current technology-based content and devices in improving the effectiveness of education meaningfully and appropriately. Incorporating technology in educational settings has been widely regarded as a typical trend in education worldwide (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD], 2010). The e-content service provider "ebrary" conducted an on-line survey of 6,500 college students around the world about their perceptions and usage of e-books (Wagner, 2008). The results show that the majority of participants currently use electronic resources as much as print books, very often use electronic versions of books, and view instruction in information literacy as very important. More recently, researchers have found that using a variety of technology devices and computer programs in teacher education programs could influence pre-service teachers' competency and fluency in technology use (Angeli, 2005; Goktas & Demirel, 2012; §endag, 2010; Yeh & Cheng, 2010). However, many other studies have indicated that using technology in instruction will be valuable only when teachers believe it is valuable (Ottenbreit-Leftwich, Glazewski, Newby, & Ertmer, 2010). In order to prepare pre-service teachers appropriately in today's teacher education programs, it is important to understand their perceptions and competency level of using computer technology.

The National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education ([NCATE], 2008) defined Unit Standards for education faculty members' technology use. The relevant standards for this study are: teaching by professional education faculty integrates diversity and technology throughout coursework, field experiences, and clinical practices (standard 5) and pre-service teachers should have access to exemplary library, curricular, and electronic information resources that serve not only the unit but also a broader constituency (Standard 6). These standards make it important for education faculty members to integrate technology into college class activities or assignments. This study investigated per-service teachers' perception of and technology competency in creating and using e-picture books in their future classrooms. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.