Academic journal article Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies

Part Two Freud: A Temporal Lacuna: Introduction

Academic journal article Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies

Part Two Freud: A Temporal Lacuna: Introduction

Article excerpt

In this part of the book, I will attempt to trace a phenomenon symptomatic to the psychoanalytic method: a blind spot which overlooks temporality. The attempt to show Freud's blindness to the question of time is far from simple. While Freudian theory contains several explicit references to time, implicitly, it harbors a comprehensive notion of time. I will seek to demonstrate that the conceptual framework underlying Freud's thinking about time is restricted to a linear notion of time, antithetical to Heidegger's Temporality as discussed throughout the first part of the book. As a first step in analyzing Freud's notion of time I will focus on one of his early works, the "Project for a Scientific Psychology" [1895]. The next step will show how his incorporation of Brentano's philosophy opened for Freud a window through which he could observe the same clinical findings known to his contemporaries and reposition them within the epistemological framework outlined in the "project". In addition, I will demonstrate that the incorporation of Brentano's epistemology into Freud's thinking meant grounding the psychoanalytic project in the metaphysical assumption of linear time characteristic of the views of his teacher. All this is found in chapter four. In the fifth chapter, I will show, through my analysis of the case of Ida Bauer, how the linear notion of time, dwelling at the core of psychoanalytic theory, limits the technique of interpretation put forward by Freud, stressing the need for a method of interpretation based on the phenomenon of temporality. Finally, in the sixth chapter, I will show that the temporal lacuna, made evident in my analysis of the "Project" and of Ida's case study, is prevalent throughout Freud's writings.

I have chosen to begin with an analysis of the "Project" as, in my opinion, it possesses a significant and extraordinary status within the Freudian corpus. …

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