Academic journal article Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

Editor's Page

Academic journal article Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

Editor's Page

Article excerpt

In The Saloon on the Prairie: The Family and the Saloon in Braidwood, Illinois, 1865-1883 Steven Barleen challenges the common historical interpretation that working class saloon culture was primarily a place for single men, who worked in hard, industrial jobs, to drown their pain in alcohol. Barleen also challenges the commonly held contemporary middle class view that Braidwood saloons bred a culture of violence. What he found instead was that far from being a male-dominated world prone to mayhem, Braidwood saloons were gathering and recreational places for men, women, and even children. In times of trouble and hardship or events they could celebrate, the Braidwood community sought each other out in their local pubs.

In The Discriminating Priority of Integration in Open Housing Activism: St. Louis County 1968-1977, Luke Ritter examines how groups, such as the New Neighbors, who claimed to support and promote open housing policies, actually helped perpetuate patterns of residential segregation that still exist today. By pursing racial balance strategies in inner-ring suburbs, these groups and their supporters restricted opportunities for low-income African Americans who had no means to leave deteriorating urban areas.

In A Priest on the Front Lines: Father Martin B. …

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