Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

Hospital-Based Fall Program Measurement and Improvement in High Reliability Organizations

Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

Hospital-Based Fall Program Measurement and Improvement in High Reliability Organizations

Article excerpt

Abstract

Falls and fall injuries in hospitals are the most frequently reported adverse event among adults in the inpatient setting. Advancing measurement and improvement around falls prevention In the hospital is important as falls are a nurse sensitive measure and nurses play a key role in this component of patient care. A framework for applying the concepts of high reliability organizations to falls prevention programs is described, including discussion of the core characteristics of such a model and determining the impact at the patient, unit, and organizational level. This article showcases the components of a patient safety culture and the integration of these components with fall prevention, the role of nurses, and high reliability.

Citation: Quigley, P., White, S., (May 31, 2013) "Hospital-Based Fall Program Measurement and Improvement in High Reliability Organizations" OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 18, No. 2, Manuscript 5.

DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Voll8No02Man05

Key words: Falls, measurement, nurse sensitive, High Reliability Organizations

Advancing measurement and improvement around falls prevention in the hospital is important as falls are a nurse sensitive measure and nurses play a key role in this component of patient care (AHRO. 2012: Quigley. Neilv. Watson. Strobel. & Wright. 2007: White. 2012J. A framework for applying the concepts of high reliability organizations to falls prevention programs is described Including determining the impact at the patient, unit, and organizational level. This article showcases the components of a patient safety culture and the integration of these components with fall prevention, role of nurses, and high reliability.

Falls and Fall Injury in Hospitals

Fall measurements have been identified as important to patient outcomes by several organizations based on the fact that falls are the most frequently reported adverse patient event among adults in the inpatient setting (Currie. 2008). However, not all falls can be prevented. Falls can be categorized as anticipated, accidental, and physiological (Morse. 1997). Regardless of the Fall type of fall, injuries can occur in all types of falls, and programs are designed to measurements prevent falls as well as fall injuries,

number one adverse event with approximately 3-20% of inpatients falling at least once during their hospitalization. Of those, 30 to 51% of falls in hospitals result in some injury (Oliver. Healev. & Haines. 2010J. Of these, 6 to 44% experience similar types of injury (e.g., fracture, subdural hematomas, or excessive bleeding) that may lead to death. Adjusted to 2010 dollars, one fall without serious injury costs hospitals an additional $3,500, while patients with more than 2 falls without serious injury have increased costs of $16,500. Falls with serious injury are the costliest with additional costs to hospitals of $27,000 (Wu. Keeler. Rubenstein. Maalione. & Shekelle. 2010J. Many interventions to prevent falls and fall-related injuries have been tested. However, they require multidisciplinary support for program adoption and reliable Implementation for specific at-risk and vulnerable subpopulations, such as the frail elderly and those at risk for injury (Oliver et al. 2010: Sooelstra. Given & Given. 2012J. The following organizations are key stakeholders in falls and data prevention.

Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services(CMS) and Hospital Falls Data

Improving the quality of care and patient safety is a priority for government, payers, and providers, and falls are one example of concern to these health care organizations. In 2008, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) identified falls as a Hospital Acquired Condition (HAC). An HAC is a complication or comorbidity (CC) or major complication or comorbidity (MCC) that occurs as a consequence of hospitalization and is high volume and/or high cost, and be reasonably preventable using evidence-based guidelines (Radev & LaBresh. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.