Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Jesuits of the Low Countries: Identity and Impact (1540-1773). Proceedings of the International Congress at the Faculty of Theology and Religous Studies, KU Leuven (3-5 December 2009)

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Jesuits of the Low Countries: Identity and Impact (1540-1773). Proceedings of the International Congress at the Faculty of Theology and Religous Studies, KU Leuven (3-5 December 2009)

Article excerpt

The Jesuits of the Low Countries: Identity and Impact (1540-1773). Proceedings of the International Congress at the Faculty of Theology and Religous Studies, KU Leuven (3-5 December 2009). Edited by Rob Faesen and Leo Kenis. (Walpole, MA: Peeters. 2012. Pp. x, 295. euro65,00 paperback. ISBN 978-90-429-2698-1.)

In keeping with the last decade's surge in interest in the Catholic experience in the early-modern Low Countries, scholars and archivists of early-modern Netherlandish Jesuítica gathered in Leuven in 2009 for a colloquium on the state of the research field. This resulting conference volume comprises twelve articles on various historical topics, ranging from spirituality to education to mission, and six articles on the state of archival holdings for the various Jesuit provinces in the Low Countries. As such, the volume is a useful snapshot of current research into the preoccupations-educational, intellectual, and missionary-of the Society of Jesus in this region (the present-day Benelux) between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries.

The essays in this volume attest to both the diversity and the energy of Jesuit activities in the Low Countries in the period; yet they also underscore the fundamental unifying goal behind of all these efforts-namely, the advancement of the Catholic Church in Netherlandish society. We learn, for example, how much effort the fathers invested in developing a legal framework for Catholic spirituality, thereby producing an impressive array of judicial literature during the period. Likewise, Belgian Jesuits developed theories of statecraft and politics that were designed to promote the restoration of Catholic piety and devotion to the reconquered Spanish Netherlands. Even as esoteric a discipline as mathematics was exploited by Jesuit scholars to advance Catholic military success. To foster greater devotion, Jesuits functioned also as active champions of the visual arts and the printing press. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.