Academic journal article Journal of Economic and Social Studies

Government Expenditure on Nomadic Education in Nigeria: Implications for Achieving the Millennium Development Goals

Academic journal article Journal of Economic and Social Studies

Government Expenditure on Nomadic Education in Nigeria: Implications for Achieving the Millennium Development Goals

Article excerpt

Introduction

Education is the spring board for social and economic change. It plays a major role in the socio-economic development of a nation. Education occupies an important place in most plans for economic and social development. It is important in the human development as a supplier of the trained man power as well as a requisite for the accomplishment of other development goals (Adebiye,2004). These roles played by the educational sector stimulate economic growth and development of a country. This explains why countries of the world expend so much on this vital sec- tor in order to enhance the level of literacy of their citizenry. Inequality of access to education and educational marginalization have deleterious effects on the national development of a country. In Nigeria, however, available records have shown that expenditure on education is below the internationally acceptable standard. Accord- ing to the UNDP Human Development Report (2008), Nigeria spends almost an insignificant proportion of its financial resources on education, the expenditure on education in Nigeria as a proportion of GDP averaged 5.84 percent, which falls below the UNESCO's benchmark of 26 percent of the budgets of developing coun- tries. This accounts for the sluggish educational growth rate of 0.59 in the country. The poor funding of education in Nigeria has over time deprived a lot of Nigerians access to education. According to Nafisatu and Abdu (2010), out of the estimated population of 9.4 million nomads in Nigeria,3.3 million are children of school age, but the participation of the nomads in the existing formal and non-formal education programs is abysmally low, with a literacy rate ranging between 0.2% and 2.9%. The Nigerian nomadic pastoralists are made up of the Fulani (5.3m), Shuwa (1.01m), Koyam (32,000), Badai (20,000), Dark Buzzu (15,000) and the Buduma (10,000). The Fulani are found in 31 out of the 36 states of Nigeria, while others reside mainly on the Borno plains and shores of Lake Chad. The migrant fishing groups account for about 2.8 million, comprising numerous tribes. They are found in the Atlantic coastline, the riverside areas and river basins of the country. These groups of people amongst others do not have access to functional education in the country over time. In the quest to remove the chronic illiteracy among this mobile population of Nigeria, the federal government of Nigeria introduced Nomadic Education Program (NEP) in 1986. NEP was designed to provide the nomads with the relevant and funda- mental basic education that would improve their survival skills. This was expected to provide them with the knowledge and the skills that would enable them raise their productivity and income; as well as empower them to participate effectively in the socio-economic and political affairs of the country. In a bid to achieving these goals, the National Commission for Nomadic Education (NCNE) was established in 1989 with the mandate to: a) formulate policies and guidelines on all matters relating to nomadic education in Nigeria; b) provide funds for research and personnel develop- ment for the improvement of nomadic education; and develop programs on nomadic education and provide equipment, instructional materials, construction of classrooms and other facilities for nomadic education (Nafisatu and Bashir,2010).

Over the years, the government has been spending money on the nomadic education program so as to provide an unfettered access to quality basic education for the nomads. The aim is to equip them with the skills and competencies that will enhance their well- being and participation in the nation-building process. The Nigerian government con- siders nomadic education as a veritable measure for the development of the universal basic education with a view to achieving the Education for All (EFA) goals and the Mil- lennium Development Goals ( National Commission for Nomadic Education,2002 ). An assessment of the results of the program against its objectives thus far is impera- tive. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.