Academic journal article Pakistan Historical Society. Journal of the Pakistan Historical Society

The Quaid and History

Academic journal article Pakistan Historical Society. Journal of the Pakistan Historical Society

The Quaid and History

Article excerpt

Before World War II the subcontinent was an occupied colony, like many others in Asia and Africa.

After years of political struggle waged by men like Quaid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah and Allama Iqbal, the British occupiers, weakened and devastated by ravages of war, were forced to give up their occupation and leave the subcontinent, creating two separate sovereign nations of Pakistan and India through an act of parliament.

The residents of all British colonies, desirous of embarking on foreign travels were forced to seek a British passport. Even Palestinians living today in occupied Gaza and the West Bank, who want to travel abroad to wage their political struggle for liberation, have to acquire a travel document issued by the occupying Israeli state.

It is totally out of sync to draw parallels between British travel documents issued to leaders of the Muslim League and the Congress and voluntary acquiring of British nationality by any citizen of India or Pakistan, who chose to proceed on self-exile and seek foreign nationalities, instead of political asylum on legitimate grounds. Ayatollah Khomeini was imprisoned for 18 months and then forced to exile by Shah of Iran in 1964.

He first sought refuge in Turkey, then in Iraq and finally political asylum in France, from where he continued to denounce Shah and lead a struggle for 15 years, without seeking any foreign nationality or social welfare benefits.

He returned to Iran in 1979 after Shah was forced to go in exile. Khomeini lived and died in Iran as an Iranian national.

The Quaid, like other British subjects under the colonial rule, was forced to seek the British passport by extraordinary circumstances such as those faced by Palestinian leadership under occupation.

From 1940 onwards, the Quaid never used British travel document, nor left the country. …

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