Academic journal article International Education Studies

Efficiency at Faculties of Economics in the Czech Public Higher Education Institutions: Two Different Approaches

Academic journal article International Education Studies

Efficiency at Faculties of Economics in the Czech Public Higher Education Institutions: Two Different Approaches

Article excerpt

Abstract

The paper evaluates research and teaching efficiency at faculties of economics in the public higher education institutions in the Czech Republic. Evaluation is provided in two periods between the years 2006-2010 and 2007-2011. For this evaluation the Data Envelopment Analysis and Index approach are used. Data Envelopment Analysis measures research efficiency according to weighted inputs (average wages of academic staff, number of academic staff, and average number of students) to weighted output (RIV points). Teaching efficiency is measured according to weighted output (average number of absolvents). Index approach compares changes between productivity measured in two different ways (RIV points per academic staff, number of students per academic staff) and changes between average wages adjusted of average inflation rate. Although we evaluate research and teaching efficiency with different approaches, some similiraties can be found. Therefore, the detailed comparison of the results is provided. For the analysis we use data from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MSMT) and from the Research, Development and Innovation Council (RWI).

Keywords: competitiveness, data envelopment analysis, efficiency, higher education institutions, index approach, labour costs, productivity, RIV point

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

1. Introduction

1.1 Czech Public Higher Education System

The higher education system in the Czech Republic is divided into two types of the higher education institutions (hereafter: HEI) - university and nonuniversity. These types are additionally divided into three different categories according to the founder of a HEI: public, private and state. There are 45 public HEIs, 26 private HEIs and 2 state HEIs in the academic year 2012/2013. Most of them are situated in the capital city of Prague. The relevance of the private HEIs (which have been established since the academic year 2000/2001) has been rising because of the necessity of the augmentation of the number of the inhabitants with the university degree. The average annual growth of the number of students at the private HEIs (since the academic year 2000/2001) represents 27%. On the contrary, the average annual growth of the number of students at the public HEIs reaches only 5% in the period in question. It implicates the increasing importance of the private HEIs in the Czech higher education system.

According to the announcement of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MSMT) about the future reform in higher education (MSMT, 2002) the efficiency in the Czech higher education is currently widely discussed. The reform proposes to divide higher education institutions into two main areas - research institutions, educational institutions. For this reason the research and educational efficiency of each HEI must be measured. The measurement goes along with the Strategic plan for 2011-2015 (MSMT, 2010). This strategic plan covers many areas in the Czech public higher education system. Main priority areas are Quality and relevance, Openness and Efficiency and financing. The most crucial accent is devoted to challenges in labour mobility, research and efficiency in financing of HEIs. Strategic plan follows European education strategy (OECD, 2006), which covers the main challenges for the future of higher education in Europe (Yemini, 2012).

1.2 Evaluation of Research and Development

The research and development in the Czech Republic is evaluated according to the "Methodology of Evaluation of Research Institutions Results and of Evaluation of Finished Programmes" published by the Research, Development and Innovation Council. This methodology is focused on results that were produced by each research organisation in the last five years. As Flégl, Zagata & Brozová (2012) noted the official evaluation process is based on formalised procedures. Methodology differentiated between two categories of results: (I) results of the basic research - books, papers in scientific journals, conference proceedings and (II) results of applied research - patents, prototypes, industrial designs, maps, certified methods, and software. …

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