Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Jefferson Interprofessional Clinical Rounding Project: An Innovative Approach to Patient Care

Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Jefferson Interprofessional Clinical Rounding Project: An Innovative Approach to Patient Care

Article excerpt

BACKGROUND: Bedside rounding is an historical clinical model that brings together care providers and the patient to discuss the plan of care. Interprofessional clinical rounding is an approach that uses this historical model to involve multiple health professions. This study was conducted to determine if a model of interprofessional clinical rounding could be implemented successfully in an acute care setting. METHODS: Teams consisting of medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were assigned to work with the attending physician (AP) in the colorectal surgery service. Prior to the rounding experience, students met to review and discuss patients' data from their discipline-specific perspective and then made a presentation of the case to the AP, who used these presentations as an educational opportunity, asking probing questions. A structured observation form was used to assess the team members' interaction during this process, and a debriefing was held at the conclusion of each experience. FINDINGS: Results of the observations suggested that most students were very engaged in the process, while summaries of the debriefing revealed a high level of satisfaction among participants. All groups suggested that they had a better understanding of the roles of other professions as a result of the increased communication and claimed that the process resulted in a more patient-centered approach. They also claimed that the additional information provided through the team approach resulted in a more integrated plan of care because input is provided from these different perspectives. CONCLUSION: Interprofessional bedside rounding can be implemented successfully, resulting in a more effective experience for health professions students. J Allied Health 2013; 42(4):197-201.

THE COMPLEXITY AND RISKS associated with conditions related to the aging population in the United States pose a challenge to managing care. Emerging research has suggested that improved collaboration among health care providers can improve the delivery of services and make a positive impact on care.1 Numerous reports over the past two decades have made strong recommendations for the inclusion of interprofessional practice as an integral part of the nation's health care system. For example, one of the recommendations in the 1998 Pew Health Professions Commission report was to "require interdisciplinary competence in all health professionals."2 In a 2003 educational summit, the Institute of Medicine, emphasized the need for all health professionals to be educated to provide patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary teams.3 Another Institute of Medicine publication, To Err is Human4 suggested that patient safety is at risk if health care providers do not communicate effectively with each other and work collaboratively. They recommended that organizations establish interdisciplinary team training programs that incorporate proven methods of team management.

The US federal government is also supporting the efforts to advance interprofessional practice. In addition to requiring interprofessional approaches in many of their grant programs, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Bureau of Health ProfesDr. sions (BHPr), in 2012, funded a cooperative agreement for the creation of a coordinating center for interprofessional education and collaborative practice (CCIPECP). The goal of the CC-IPECP is to facilitate the transformation of the current healthcare delivery system into an integrated one, informed by interprofessional education, to become the new national norm in the US.5 On an international level, the World Health Organization in a 2010 report, Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice, called for action by policy-makers, decision-makers, educators, health workers, and community leaders to imbed interprofessional education and collaborative practice in all of the services that they delivered.6 Given this increased recognition of the benefits of interprofessional approaches, educators are encouraged to reexamine the educational practices of pre-licensure health professional students. …

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