Academic journal article Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling

Special Topic: Current Perspectives on the Assessment of Giftedness - Part II: Guest Editorial

Academic journal article Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling

Special Topic: Current Perspectives on the Assessment of Giftedness - Part II: Guest Editorial

Article excerpt

In the previous issue of this journal, we published four papers on the theme of new ap- proaches to conceptualizing and assessing giftedness. The current issue adds an addition- al five papers to this special focus. The first paper of this issue, entitled "Evaluating mathematical creativity: The interplay between multiplicity and insight" by Leikin (2013), like Kontoyianni et al. (2013), explores the domain of mathematics. This concep- tual paper proposes a model to differentiate among levels of mathematical creativity through two dimensions, which she labels multiplicity (divergent thinking) and insight (convergent thinking). The model was tested on a sample of four groups of students differentiated on the basis of general giftedness (gifted; non-gifted) and excellence in Mathematics (excellent; non-excellent).

The second paper, "Mathematical foundations of and empirical investigations into the dynamic of top positions: Stabilization effect, reversed Matthew effect, and Heraclitus effect", by Ziegler, Heckel, and Ziegler (2013) analyses the highest levels of perfor- mance (top positions) through the lens of mathematics. The authors detail three proposi- tions - the stabilization effect, the reversed Matthew effect, and the Heraclitus effect - related to outstanding performance, which they empirically illustrate through the do- mains of chess and soccer.

The third paper entitled "How brain research can contribute to the evaluation of mathe- matical giftedness" by Leikin, Waisman, and Leikin (2013) also targets mathematical giftedness. The paper shares some assumptions with the earlier paper by Leikin (2013) in differentiating students on the basis of general giftedness and excellence in mathematics. In this paper, however, the researchers draw on neurocognitive approaches to identify mathematical giftedness in schoolchildren.

The fourth paper, "Multiple Intelligences: Can they be measured?", by Tirri, Nokelainen, and Komulainen (2013) details the development and validation of a self-report instru- ment to measure the intelligences identified by Gardner (1983) in his theory of Multiple Intelligences. In the paper, Tirri and her colleagues report on the psychometric validation of the measurement instrument with an empirical sample of approximately 400 students.

The final paper entitled "A cross-cultural validation study of the Questionnaire of Edu- cational and Learning Capital (QELC) in China, Germany and Turkey" by Vladut, Liu, Leana-Tascila, Vialle, and Ziegler (2013) also reports on the validation of an instrument for the measurement of giftedness. …

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