Academic journal article Social Security Bulletin

In Memory of Daniel B. Radner-1941-1998

Academic journal article Social Security Bulletin

In Memory of Daniel B. Radner-1941-1998

Article excerpt

It is with deep regret that we inform readers of the death of Daniel B. Radner, long-time staff member of the Social Security Administration's Office of Research, Evaluation and Statistics and a frequent contributor to the Bulletin. Dr. Radner died on February 13,1998, from complications following surgery.

An economist in the Division of Economic Research since 1974, Dr. Radner began his government career in 1966 with the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce. He received his doctorate in economics from Yale University in 1974.

Dr. Radner was an internationally recognized authority on the economic status of population subgroups. During his career at SSA he published a series of definitive studies that documented the financial circumstances of the American population, with special emphasis on the aged. Many of these studies analyzed trends in the well-being of various population subgroups in light of the growth in the economy and changes in government policies. Much of his work reflected his belief that the economic status of the aged should be assessed in comparison with that of the nonaged population.

He also made important contributions to improving measures of economic well-being and was particularly interested in how noncash income, such as food stamps, housing subsidies, and Medicare, supplement money income to meet the economic needs of the elderly. His work emphasized the importance of incorporating measures of wealth, as well as income, in assessments of economic well-being and stressed the need to examine distributions of income and wealth rather than potentially misleading averages. His research also helped clarify the importance of incorporating both the size and composition of family units in assessing their economic wellbeing and the importance of using consistent measures of needs and resources in developing equivalence scales. …

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