Academic journal article Journal of Religion and Film

There Will Come a Day

Academic journal article Journal of Religion and Film

There Will Come a Day

Article excerpt

There Will Come a Day

Directed by Giorgio Diritti

World Dramatic Competition

Tragedy and loss bookend this beautiful and honest depiction of the quest for spiritual recovery in the life of a young Italian woman. Augusta's (Jasmine Trinca) dark journey of transformation begins with the haunting image of a fetus in sonogram juxtaposed with a bright half-moon, invoking an icon; a cut to Augusta sobbing indicates that something terrible has happened. Indeed, infertility has cost her her marriage. Her father's recent death also seems to be ever-present for her and her mother (Anne Alvaro), from whom she is emotionally and geographically distant.

Augusta's way of rebuilding her life is to aid an older nun, Sister Franca (Pia Engleberth), as she ministers to the Indio villages along the Amazon River, whose poverty the nun compares to the poor material state into which Jesus was born. Along the way they encounter a Pentecostal church in one of the missions Sister Franca had established, but they are ousted by the fire-breathing pastor who derides their Catholicism as "impure." Clearly the nun has been long devoted to improving these peoples' lives, both materially and spiritually, but the world is changing, even along the Amazon. There is a clear tension between the two women over Franca's way of assisting these peoples, and finally Augusta confronts the nun. "Baptisms, confessions... is that what makes you happy?

You're making them do things they don't understand!" In an interview with JR& F, director Giorgio Diritti elaborated on his skepticism regarding the Church, and religion in general. "Perhaps the weakness of the religion is that it is too certain. . . . [People's spirituality] is in an ongoing state of evolution."

Augusta disembarks at the stilt-house favela in the city of Manaus, Brazil, whose community is under the threat of destruction by the government's anti- poverty relocation measures. She quickly finds purpose by organizing several men into a work team that keeps them from needing to leave the favela. The community creates a stable and meaningful force in Augusta's life, and she responds by befriending the local children and even considering love with a young man in the work force. …

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