Academic journal article English Journal

From the Editors

Academic journal article English Journal

From the Editors

Article excerpt

The idea for this issue's theme arose within a pro- fessional discussion-an argument, really-about whether English teachers are teachers of literacy. This led to an attempt to agree about what literacy means. It is much more than reading and writing. Literacy is associated with receptive and expressive abilities as well as technology, numeracy, and sci- ence. Literacy links to cultural awareness, social in- teraction, and relations of power. As Paulo Freire famously stated, to be literate is to be able to "read the word and the world."

Literacy specialists can develop expertise in many areas. Examples include developmental liter- acy, second language acquisition, and critical media literacy. In secondary English classrooms, these fea- tures intersect because, simply put, literacy involves making meanings from texts. And in today's world, what counts as "texts" is constantly evolving.

Making meanings from texts requires both re- ceptive and expressive skills; students must be able to engage with a text, connect it to their own ex- perience, interpret this connection, and then dem- onstrate the meanings they have constructed. This sentence is deceptively straightforward. The vari- ables are endless: Who are the students? What are the texts? What experiences are available to learners? What interpretive tools are accessible for applica- tion? What opportunities for demonstration exist?

Teachers in English classrooms negotiate these variables every day, making decisions about the methods and materials they will use to help students make meanings from texts. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.