Academic journal article International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology

Organizational Climate in Spanish Public Health Services: Administration and Services Staff

Academic journal article International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology

Organizational Climate in Spanish Public Health Services: Administration and Services Staff

Article excerpt

Improving the quality of mental health assistance in healthcare services is a main objective for both professionals and the administration (Figueiredo-Ferraz, Grau-Alberola, Gil-Monte, & García-Juesas, 2012). There is currently growing interest in using a positive approach in institutions, promoting health at the workplace and other relevant factors (Ariza, Quevedo-Blasco, Ramiro, & Bermúdez, 2013; Bakker, Rodríguez-Muñoz, & Derks, 2012; Fuente, et al., 2013). A good example of this is work satisfaction, given that high satisfaction indices among healthcare professionals influences the quality of the service provided and the satisfaction of the patient him/herself (DeVoe, Fryer, Hargraves, Phillips, & Green, 2002; Mello et al., 2004; Paquet & Gagnon, 2010; Pratt, 2010), whereas workers with high indices of dissatisfaction are more prone to suffering from burnout (Escriba-Agüir, Artazcoz, & Pérez-Hoyos, 2008; Lu, Barriball, Zhang, & While, 2011), physical and mental deterioration (Faragher, Cass, & Cooper, 2005) and an increase in absenteeism, change of post, with all the damage that this entails at the personal and institutional spheres (Buchbinder, Wilson, Melick, & Powe, 1999). Job satisfaction can be defined as the affective orientation an individual has toward his/her work (Price, 2001). Spector (1997) determined this affect through eleven main aspects: appreciation, communication, cooperation, rewards, work conditions, promotion, recognition, security, and supervision. Scheurer, McKean, Miller, and Wetterneck (2009) conducted a systematic review of 1,157 studies to identify the personal and organizational indicators of job satisfaction among medical staff. Among the most influential personal variables, they found age and professional specialty, and among the organizational ones they found demands, control, and colleague support, pay and incentives. Other factors that also were found to have an effect were degree of autonomy (Linzer et al., 2000; Reschovsky, Reed, Blumenthal, & Landon, 2001), quality of service appreciation (Pratt, 2010; Ziller, Coburn, & Yousefian, 2006) and gender. However, contradictory effects have been reported with respect to this last factor; Emmons, Nichols, Schulkin, Kenneth, and Cain (2006) and Keeton, Fenner, Johnson, and Hayward (2007) found that gender is neutral in the assessment of satisfaction, whereas Sparks, Corcoran, Nabors, and Hovanitz (2005) found that men feel more satisfied in their medical careers and, on the contrary, Frank, McMurray, Linzer, and Elon (1999) and McMurray, Linzer, Konrad, Douglas, Shugerman, and Nelson (2000) found that women feel more satisfied with their professional careers.

An approach of great interest which is used for the study of job environment in nursing professionals is what is called magnet hospital (Aiken, Clarke, & Sloane, 2000) that is distinguished by holding certain characteristics capable of retaining these types of professionals, such as policies for the decentralization of leadership, training, promotion, working hours flexibility, autonomy, responsibility in patient assistance, and communication with specialized personnel (Chen & Johantgen, 2010; Lu et al., 2011; McClure, Poulin, Sovie, & Wandelt, 1983). Among these aspects, the importance of interpersonal relationships is apparent, such as medical and nursing staffcommunication (Wanzer, Wojtaszczyk, & Kelly, 2009). Relationships with patients also have an influence on this sensation; thus, Figueiredo- Ferraz et al. (2012) found relationships between job satisfaction, burnout syndrome symptoms, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization.

The comparison between the job environment of healthcare and non-healthcare personnel in the Spanish population has been investigated in a previous study (García- Pozo, Moro-Tejedor, & Medina-Torres, 2010) that assessed the climate and satisfaction of 1,676 nurse and nurse assistants. …

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