Academic journal article Arab Studies Quarterly

Egypt's Tahrir Revolution

Academic journal article Arab Studies Quarterly

Egypt's Tahrir Revolution

Article excerpt

Dan Tschirgi, Walid Kazziha, and Sean F. McMahon (eds.). Egypt'sTahrir Revolution. Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 2013. 287 pages. Hardcover $65.00

This valuable collection consists of three sections, twelve chapters, in addition to an introduction and conclusion. The introduction begins with what the editors call "explosive decision" by the then newly elected president Mursi, which led to fundamental transformation of the dynamics of the Egyptian uprising and its aftermath. The presidential decree, issued by Mursi, that was intended to elevate the presidential powers above constitutional limits and judicial review, shifted the dynamics of the conflict from one between the Egyptian masses and the remnants of Mubarak's regime (the security apparatuses and the military), into one between the newly formed Islamist bloc and everyone else (including the remnants of Mubarak's regime). It is this critical, alas dangerous, shift in the nature of confrontation, and the formation of new socio-political blocs, that steered not only the Egyptian revolution, but the Arab revolts as a whole, away from their earlier socio-economic goals.

The editors display intellectual courage when they admit that the twelve authors were surprised by the 2011 Arab uprisings. But so were almost all Arab intellectuals. This fact has called into question the epistemological standards Arab intellectuals had been employing. More than ever before, Arab revolts not only questioned mainstream Western epistemology that many prominent Arab intellectuals subscribed to, but brought to the forefront, once again, the crucial need for an Arab social science.

Part one, consisting of seven chapters, covers "the specific factors and dynamics that underpinned, and flowed from, the Egyptian revolution of January 2011" (7). It explores reasons that led to the demise of Mubarak's regime. Chapter one, "What Went Wrong with Mubarak's Regime," outlines a series of missteps, proclaimed by the regime as successes, which eroded the regime's popular support. The counter effects of Mubarak's economic policies and the glaring fraud of the 2010 parliamentary election were central causes. Walid Kazziha's chapter focuses on the regime's final few years. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.