Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Leaders of the Anglo-Saxon Church from Bede to Stigand

Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Leaders of the Anglo-Saxon Church from Bede to Stigand

Article excerpt

Leaders of the Anglo-Saxon Church from Bede to Stigand. Edited by Alexander Rumble. Publications of the Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies, vol. 12. (Woodbridge, England: Boydell Press, 2012, Pp. xii, 204. $95.00.)

This volume of essays analyzes various aspects of episcopal and monastic leadership in Anglo-Saxon England, along with examining the careers of a number of well known, as well as some more obscure, ecclesiastical leaders. The volume opens with an introductory essay by Rumble exploring the development of the ideal roles and behavioral expectations of episcopal and monastic leaders. This essay provides a framework for the nine essays that follow since the aim of this book is to investigate the ways in which actual experience fit these ideas (ix).

Essays by Martin Ryan, Debby Banham, Joyce Hill, and Alexander Rumble focus on individual bishops. Ryan discusses the career of Ecgberht of York and what his Dialogus reveals about the archbishop's concerns for the Northumbrian Church. He concludes that "significant sections of the Dialogus ... offer ways of integrating the church, its institutions, and its members into the existing legal structures and institutions of Northumbrian society" (57). Banham focuses on the promotion of Benedictine reform by Æthelwold of Winchester. She does so by examining the evidence for his promotion of monastic sign language as a way to trace the increasing emphasis on silence that she argues was characteristic of this movement. Even with recent interest in the career Wulfsige of Sherborne, Hill argues that his pastoral letter has been inexplicably ignored. She fills this gap by examining this document and what it reveals about Wulfsige's reforming agenda. Finally, Rumble includes a second very interesting essay examining the ways that archbishops Ælfheah and Stigand are remembered as victims of changing circumstances.

Instead of concentrating on the career of one or two bishops, Allan McKinley examines what little is known about the bishops of Worcester in the seventh through ninth centuries. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.