Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Maternal Schooling, Public Health Programmes and Child Morbidity in Nigeria

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Maternal Schooling, Public Health Programmes and Child Morbidity in Nigeria

Article excerpt

Abstract

The role of investment in human resources and subsequent multiplier on the economic growth of any nation has been adequately addressed in the literature. Education, a major investment in human resources helps in improving the productivity of labour in the labour market and also in influencing children mental alertness and health outcomes. Maternal education and public health programmes have been found to impact positively on child morbidity in developed countries thereby contributing to the growth of any economy, which will bring about sustainable development and inclusive growth. This work therefore examines the influence of maternal education and public health programmes on child health (morbidity) in Nigeria using the Harmonised Nigeria Living Standard Survey (2009). Descriptive Statistics and two stage least square estimation procedure were used to analyse the data. The results revealed a negative relationship between child immunisation and child health (morbidity) in Nigeria. Equally, the study found out that improving girl child education will go a long way in improving child morbidity. Based on our findings, the study recommends adequate publicity for public health programmes. Also, household income enhancing interventions should be put in place, doing this will go a long way in improving child health and survival, which in the long-run will improve per-capita income and consumption.

Keywords: maternal, public health, morbidity, child survival

1. Introduction and the Background

Developed countries of the world have recorded improvement in their health indices and outcomes due to government investment in health and education, the reverse is the case for most African countries including Nigeria, despite her huge resources and annual budgetary provisions for health and education. According to NDHS (2009) statistics, population having access to potable water is less than half, it is even worse in the rural areas. There is equally a disparity in terms of access to satisfactory sanitation conditions between the rural and urban areas (32% and 41% respectively). Adult literacy rate is 56% and percentage of male is 67%, which is much higher than females. Vivid examinations of these statistics have shown that child survival and maternal health are adversely affected. Studies have shown that child health in Nigeria is affected by; nutritional deficiencies and diseases such as malaria, diarrheal, acute respiratory infection and a host of others. In view of this, it is imperative for government to put in place sound policies by putting in place programmes that will arrest the unwholesome situation so that Nigerian children can survive and live quality life. This study therefore attempts to examine the effect of mother's education and the level of responses of mothers to public health intervention programmes on child's health and survival. This paper has been divided into five sections as follows: section two reviews the relevant literatures, child morbidity and public health programmes in Nigeria is the major pre-occupation of section three. Section four is the theoretical framework, methodology, results presentation and discussion, while section five concludes and gives policy implications.

2. Literature Review

The role of investment in human resources and the subsequent multiplier on the economic growth of any nation has been adequately addressed in the literature. Education which is the major investments in human resources helps in improving the productivity of labour in the labour market and even in influencing children mental alertness and health outcomes. Thus, Strauss and Thomas (1998) are of the opinion that human capital in form of schooling is associated with enhanced labour output. Investment in health is also an investment in human resources. Health according to Rubalcava and Tervei (2004) is a good that each household produces and allocated between market and non-market activities. …

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