Academic journal article Research in Applied Economics

Constructing a Model for Creating Movie Trailers Increase Customers' Desire

Academic journal article Research in Applied Economics

Constructing a Model for Creating Movie Trailers Increase Customers' Desire

Article excerpt

Abstract

Nowadays, movie box-office revenue and movie theater visitor numbers are relatively stagnant. A particular problem is that there are fewer movie goers among young people in their early twenties to early thirties, who tend to spend more. In order to solve this problem, it is important to use advertising to increase customers' desire to watch movies, and movie trailers in particular play a significant role. Currently, the production of movie trailers is very subjective and relies on experience and intuition. It is a matter of concern that the relative quality of movie trailers is inconsistent and, furthermore, qualitative evaluations are ambiguous (implicit). Thus, this research aims to create movie trailers that will increase customers' desire to watch movies by using statistical science and biometrics. Specifically, this involves (1) investigating the compositional elements of movie trailers, (2) conducting tests using electrodermal responses, (3) analysing lines of sight during viewing of movie trailers, (4) analysing the scenes composing the trailer using pair comparison, and (5) measuring brain activity during viewing of movie trailers. Based on the findings, the authors constructed a "movie trailer scene composition model" by quantitatively clarifying factors such as when and what kind of scenes should be incorporated into movie trailers. This model has been used to create movie trailers that will increase customers' desire to watch movies, and the required results have been attained.

Keywords: compositional elements model of movie trailers; electro dermal responses; measuring brain activity

1. Introduction

Moviemaking has become a major industry in Japan. Due to factors such as the emergence of multi-screen cinema complexes, the number of movie theater screens and the number of movies shown have both been increasing in recent years. By contrast, growth in box office revenue and movie theater visitor numbers has slowed and leveled off since 2001, making it necessary for today's industry to improve the quality of its advertising to increase the customers' desire to watch movies.

Currently, movie trailers are created by movie trailer producers based on the concept of the film. However, the creative process is a subjective one that depends on the producer's intuition and technique, and the quality of the resulting trailer varies significantly with the producer who created it. This study aims to propose a movie trailer scene compositional model by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of movie trailers that increase the viewers' desire to watch movies and to facilitate the creation of trailers that increase that desire based on that model.

2. State of the Movie Industry in Japan

Growth in box office revenue and movie theater visitor numbers has been flat in recent years (Japanese Movie Industry Statistics, 2012). Advertising that increases the customers' desire to watch movies will be important in resolving this issue, and movie trailers have a major role to play. Since production of movie trailers is a subjective process characterized by significant variations in quality, the ambiguity of assessments of their quality remains an outstanding problem. Compared to box office revenue of ?170.862 billion and theater attendance of 1,353.9 million in 2000, revenue and attendance have shown growth, reaching highs of ?220.737 billion and 1,743.58 million in 2010. Yet figures for 2011 show a decrease in both metrics, with revenue falling to ?181.197 billion and attendance to 1,447.26 million. By contrast, the number of films showing exceeded 800 in 2006 and, despite a subsequent slight decline, was still 799 in 2011, 100 films more than around 2003. The number of screens, which was about 2,500 in 2000, exceeded 3,000 in 2006 and reached about 3,400 in 2011, indicating an increasing trend in recent years. Simply increasing the number of films and screens is not sufficient to boost box office revenue and movie theater visitor numbers. …

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