Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences

E-Government and E-Governance: The Future Isn't What It Used to Be

Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences

E-Government and E-Governance: The Future Isn't What It Used to Be

Article excerpt

Abstract

Public sector organizations in North America and Europe are gradually transforming themselves under the pressure exerted by Internet technologies. Most of these organizations are beyond Web publishing and are passing through the interactive stage, gradually sidling up to the challenges of creating end-to-end processes that deliver enhanced value from public administration. In the not-too-distant future, these organizations will have to manage increased speed of reflexivity in their relationship with the citizenry. In other words, it is not just a question of e-government; it is also a question of e-governance. The future of government as we might have imagined it 10 years ago is not the future of government today. Our paper proposes a two-dimensional framework for considering the impact of the Internet. On one axis, we propose the dimension of e-government versus e-governance. On the other dimension, we contrast the citizen-centric view of the relationship with the organization-centric. In each of the resulting four quadrants of the model, we examine the issues and considerations. Finally, we analyze the resource allocation decisions made public by the federal government to identify where the financial commitments have been made in the context of the model.

Resume

Les organisations du secteur public de l'Amerique du Nord et de l'Europe se transforment progressivement sous la pression des technologies de l'Internet. La plupart de ces organisations, qui ont deji depasse l'etape de la creation des pages, passent par une phase interactive, relevant progressivement les defis de la creation des processus de bout en bout qui donne une plus grande valeur a l'administration publique. Dans un futur proche, ces organisations auront a gerer, dans leur relation avec les citoyens, la vitesse croissante de refiexiviti. En d'autres termes, il ne s'agit pas seulement d'une question de gouvernement electronique; il s'agit aussi d'une question de gouvernance electronique. L'avenir du gouvernement d'aujourd'hui est different de celui qu'on aurait imagine il y a de cela 10 ans. Dans cette etude, nous proposons un cadre bidimensionnel permettant de mesurer l'impact de l'Internet. Sur le premier axe, nous proposons la dimension gouvernement electronique vs gouvernance electronique. Le second axe s'appesantit sur le contraste entre deux conceptions antinomiques de la relation : la conception centree sur le citoyen et la conception centrie sur l'organisation. Dans chacun des quatre quadrants resultant du modele, nous examinons les problemes et les solutions possibles. Pour etudier dans quel cas les engagements financiers ont eti pris dans le contexte du modele, nous cloturons notre etude par l'analyse des decisions d'attribution des ressources rendues publiques par le gouvernement federal.

Public sector organizations in North America and Europe are gradually transforming themselves as a consequence of opportunity pressure points created and enabled by Internet technologies. Most of these organinations are now well beyond Web publishing, and have begun to implement transactional capabilities. Individual transaction systems are giving way to Internet-based end-to-end processes, and in the not too distant future governments will face a new challenge: the very technologies that deliver enhanced value in public administration will produce new demands for enhanced reflexivity, transparency, and accountability from governments.

The aim of this paper is to explore some of the ramifications of the move by national governments to provide information and services electronically. The Government of Canada launched its Government OnLine (GOL) initiative in the Speech from the Throne in 1999 (Government of Canada, 1999). In a much-quoted paragraph setting out the agenda for the period ending in 2004, the federal government seeks to turn Canada into the most connected nation on earth. Other countries, most recently Japan, have made similar policy statements. …

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